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Latest from Elaine McArdle

  • JET-Powered Learning

    August 21, 2019

    1L January Experiential Term courses focus on skills-building, collaboration and self-reflection

  • illustration of houses and network

    Are Americans Getting Enough Fiber?

    July 23, 2019

    The U.S. is falling behind in fiber optic technology, but cities and localities are leading the way.

  • Logan Leslie at the doorway of the Caspersen Room at Harvard Law Library

    Logan Leslie: From active duty to actively recruiting veterans

    May 23, 2019

    Logan Leslie JD/MBA ’19 loved military service and planned to spend his lifetime in it. But a growing family—along with the ‘heartbreaking’ poverty and failed institutions he witnessed in Afghanistan—spurred him to serve in a different way.

  • Dan Eaton at podium

    Empowered and Supported

    January 29, 2019

    HLSA President Dan Eaton ’89 wants to share the benefits of a remarkable experience.

  • montage of criminal law faculty

    Making the Case for Criminal Justice Reform

    January 29, 2019

    Five new lawyer-scholars at Harvard Law School are already influencing the national conversation on our criminal law system.

  • Andrew Manuel Crespo

    Andrew Manuel Crespo: Practice Meets Theory

    January 29, 2019

    As staff attorney with the Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia for more than three years, Assistant Professor Andrew Manuel Crespo '08 represented adults and juveniles charged with felonies ranging from armed robberies to homicides. Passionate about the work, he had no plans to become an academic. But early in his career, then-Dean Martha Minow engaged him in a life-changing conversation.

  • Crystal Yang

    Crystal Yang: An Empirical Approach

    January 29, 2019

    Assistant Professor Crystal Yang ’13, who joined the HLS faculty in 2014, brings an empirical focus to the study of criminal law. Yang, who holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard, has in the past focused her empirical studies on criminal sentencing. She has now turned her attention to the extensive use of cash bail and pretrial detention in the U.S., in order to understand their short- and long-term consequences.

  • Daphna Renan

    Daphna Renan: Presidential Power, National Security

    January 29, 2019

    "I think criminal procedure is a very fundamental part of the constitutional law of democracy,” says Assistant Professor Daphna Renan, who writes about structural constitutional law, administrative law, and the Fourth Amendment. “When can the government use force against its own citizens? When can it search individuals, communities and communications? How do emergent technologies challenge existing legal frameworks? For anyone who cares about power and how law constrains and enables it, there are no more pressing questions than these.”

  • Elizabeth Papp Kamali

    Elizabeth Papp Kamali: Medieval England’s Lessons for Today

    January 29, 2019

    There are more than 2 million people imprisoned in the U.S. today. One hundred years from now, historians are likely to be fascinated by this carceral state: How did we get here? Are there better options for society? Some of the answers—or, at least, possible alternatives—may lie in an examination of medieval England. As a Harvard undergrad, Assistant Professor Elizabeth Papp Kamali ’07 fell in love with medieval legal history. After graduating from HLS, she got her Ph.D. in history at the University of Michigan, then joined the HLS faculty in 2015.

  • Anna Lvovsky

    Anna Lvovsky: Police Power in the System

    January 29, 2019

    Assistant Professor Anna Lvovsky '13, who joined the HLS faculty in 2017, always planned to teach. A legal historian - she holds a Ph.D. from Harvard - with a focus on the administration of criminal justice, she teaches a seminar on the history of policing in the U.S. as well as courses on evidence and criminal law that invite students to focus on the systemic effects of seemingly neutral legal rules.

  • Eve Howe ’21: 'I want to use my degree or knowledge to help'

    Eve Howe ’21: ‘I want to use my degree or knowledge to help’

    November 6, 2018

    Eve L. Howe ’21 is an expert in nuclear submarines -- specifically, the fluid systems that cool the nuclear reactors in military submarines. Drawn to military service because she wanted to use her engineering skills for public service, Howe spent five years as an officer in the U.S. Navy, where she solved complex technical problems to ensure the submarines would be able to accomplish their missions.

  • Stephen Petraeus

    Stephen Petraeus ’21: Continuing a legacy of service

    November 6, 2018

    During his undergraduate studies, Stephen Petraeus wanted to explore a different world from the military life in which grew up. But as a sophomore, Petraeus felt a longing for that world and joined ROTC—a decision that led to eight years in the U.S. Army and two deployments to Afghanistan, including with the storied 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team.

  • Sara Plesser Neugroschel LL.M. ’19: Serving to prevent injustice, tyranny, and terrorism

    Sara Plesser Neugroschel LL.M. ’19: Serving to prevent injustice, tyranny, and terrorism

    November 6, 2018

    With no other members of the military in the extended family, the parents of U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Sara Plesser Neugroschel LL.M. ’19 were “very, very surprised” when she decided to commission in the Navy after her 2L year at the University of Miami Law School, from which she graduated in 2009.

  • Four images from the feature in a series

    Experiential and Essential

    August 30, 2018

    Clinical education at HLS: Four experiences

  • A portrait of

    No Crime to Be Poor

    June 26, 2018

    There is no shortage of serious legal issues facing poor people in Greater St. Louis, especially people of color, says Blake Strode ’15, who was born and raised in the area. Just three years out of HLS, Strode is back home fighting the criminalization of poverty as executive director of ArchCity Defenders, a nonprofit civil rights law firm in St. Louis that has filed landmark cases that have already improved the lives of tens of thousands of low-income people.

  • Cloud Formations

    HLS students harness artificial intelligence to revolutionize how lawyers draft and manage contracts

    December 20, 2017

    With Evisort, a powerful new search engine that harnesses cloud storage and artificial intelligence, four HLS students hope to revolutionize the costly and labor-intensive way that lawyers currently handle contracts and other transactional work, liberating them for more creative and interesting tasks.

  • As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

    As a JAG officer, Jenna Reed prosecuted some of the most serious cases in the U.S. Marine Corps

    November 8, 2017

    As a JAG officer in the U.S. Marine Corps for more than six years, Jenna E. Reed LL.M. ’18 prosecuted and defended some of the most serious cases in that branch of the military, focusing on violent and special victims crimes, including shaken-baby cases and others involving children.

  • Military experience provides “a level of discipline and willingness to work hard even when it’s uncomfortable,

    Military experience provides “a level of discipline and willingness to work hard even when it’s uncomfortable,” says Nathan Garrett Jester ’20

    November 8, 2017

    In becoming a Marine and then a lawyer, Nathan Garrett Jester ’20 is interested in someday going into local or state politics in his home state of Georgia, to serve the community where he was born and raised.

  • Steven Kerns ’20: “Leading people toward a better world required me to trade in my rifle for books”

    Steven Kerns ’20: “Leading people toward a better world required me to trade in my rifle for books”

    November 8, 2017

    Steven Kerns ’20 was a high school dropout, a self-described ‘rebel without a cause’ from Long Beach, Calif., when he joined the U.S. Army as a teenager looking for adventure, with vague notions of changing the world.

  • Being a Marine gave Isabel Marin ’20 the perspective “to see past the news to understand what’s really happening.

    Being a Marine gave Isabel Marin ’20 the perspective “to see past the news to understand what’s really happening”

    November 8, 2017

    Ever since she was little girl growing up in Washington, D.C., Isabel Marin ’20 has wanted to be a lawyer. But between graduating from Yale in 2012 and entering law school this year, Marin had an important goal: to serve as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps.

  • Assistant Professor Mark Wu

    Trade Surplus

    October 21, 2016

    International trade traditionally has been a Harvard Law School strength, but since Mark Wu’s arrival at HLS in 2011, educational opportunities in the field have exploded.