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  • Electric vehicle parking space marked with a green stencil of the letters

    Current electric vehicles subsidies fail to reduce overall emissions, says Harvard Law study

    April 7, 2022

    Subsidies offered by the federal government for the purchase of new electric vehicles (EVs) may actually increase total greenhouse gas emissions without similar aid for secondhand buyers, concludes a new study led by Ashley Nunes, Ph.D., a fellow at Harvard Law School’s Labor and Worklife Program.

  • Finger pressing a button labeled

    Algorithm nation

    March 14, 2022

    A Harvard Law School reading group debates how the law should manage self-driving cars, A.I.-generated art, and other algorithmic technology.

  • An illustration of an open bank vault with digital currency inside represented by small white squares

    The Crypto of the Realm

    January 31, 2022

    A Harvard Law class explores possibilities for a U.S. central bank digital currency, which would be sheltered from the wild fluctuations in value for which crypto is known.

  • Black and white photo of a group of people at a conference table

    To Infinity and Beyond

    January 31, 2022

    Since 2007, Gabriel Swiney has served in the State Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser. His work in space law, he says, has allowed him to merge his experience and his passion to help future generations chart a safer, fairer path to the stars.

  • Colorful illustration featuring mushrooms a microscope and other scientific devices and a man walking along a path

    Reassessing Psychedelics

    January 31, 2022

    A new Harvard Law initiative examines the legal and ethical aspects of therapeutic psychedelics

  • An illustration of a large transparent globe with DNA strands floating inside as two scientist and two others observe.

    Faculty Books in Brief: Winter 2022

    January 31, 2022

    A wide range of books by faculty, from a collection of essays on the ethics of consumer genetic testing to a look at the fate of constitutional institutions in populist regimes to a delightful children's book by a legal philosopher

  • Susan Hendrickson

    Berkman Klein Center welcomes Susan Hendrickson as executive director

    December 1, 2021

    The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University has announced the appointment of Susan Hendrickson ’93 as its new executive director.

  • Burning smartphone

    ‘The algorithm has primacy over media … over each of us, and it controls what we do’

    November 18, 2021

    Social media’s business model of personalized virality is incompatible with democracy, agreed experts at a recent Harvard Law School discussion on the state of democracy.

  • Woman talking into a microphone

    Is it time to swipe left on social media?

    October 12, 2021

    Leaked revelations about Instagram’s impact on teens have united Republicans and Democrats in considering legal reforms, say Harvard Law School scholars.

  • Illustration showing alternative clean energy sources: hydro energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and solar energy.

    Electric slide

    September 21, 2021

    Helping key players across Massachusetts — including the City of Boston and environmental nonprofits — reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 is a focus for the Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

  • Fleet of autonomous vehicles

    Robocabs could make climate change worse, say researchers at Harvard, MIT

    August 24, 2021

    A new study led by Dr. Ashley Nunes, a fellow at the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School, concluded that, counterintuitively, fleets of electric, autonomous taxis could dramatically increase energy consumption and emissions that contribute to climate change — not reduce them.

  • Minow named University Professor

    ‘We’re on a collision course with sanity’

    June 22, 2021

    Harvard University Professor and former Harvard Law School dean Martha Minow argues for a new Fairness Doctrine and other reforms in a National Constitution Center panel on free speech and media.

  • Woman with blue blazer and blue shirt and long black hair in front of pink flowering bush

    ‘We have the common ground of all getting through this together’

    May 18, 2021

    Health law has become especially timely in this year of COVID-19 vaccines and revitalized Obamacare. But for graduating student Phebe Hong ’21, it’s a passion that began in high school.

  • Sidharth Chauhan

    Rethinking digital education in a ‘global classroom’

    February 12, 2021

    As Harvard Law students across the world logged onto Zoom this fall to connect to their professors and peers, Sidharth Chauhan LL.M. ’21 took virtual education a step further.

  • Closeup of man smoking and wearing a mask

    Should smokers be prioritized for COVID vaccine?

    February 2, 2021

    Should smoking be among the pre-existing health risks that qualify people for priority access to the COVID-19 vaccine? Harvard Law public health expert Carmel Shachar says the answer is yes. 

  • Harvard and Yale health law centers partner for COVID-19 seminar series

    January 28, 2021

    The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School is joining forces with the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy, its counterpart at Yale Law School, to host a seminar series reflecting on ethical and legal issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Jonathan Zittrain delivers the 2020 Tanner Lecture

    Gaining power, losing control

    January 28, 2021

    As the 2020 Tanner Lecturer on Human Values at Clare Hall, Cambridge, Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain explores the clash of free speech and public health online.

  • Judge Julie M. Lynch presides over a courtroom remotely

    Online courts: reimagining the future of justice

    December 4, 2020

    Even if there was no COVID-19, online courts would still be the wave of the future: This idea was the starting point for a recent webinar, “Online Courts: Perspectives from the Bench and the Bar,” a half-day event convened by the Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession.

  • Male patient getting an injection in the upper arm from a doctor wearing blue gloves.

    What you should know about the COVID-19 vaccine

    December 3, 2020

    Public health expert Carmel Shachar discusses the COVID-19 vaccine, who is likely to get it first, and whether people can be required to get vaccinated.

  • Network map with different colored dots representing media outlets.

    Political discourse and the 2020 U.S. Election

    November 24, 2020

    The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society researchers Yochai Benkler and Robert Faris document how polarized media in the United States shape political discourse and the 2020 election.

  • Head silhouette with jigsaw puzzle pieces

    Detecting dementia

    November 21, 2020

    Experts gathered this week to discuss the ethical, social, and legal implications of technological advancements that facilitate the early detection of dementia.

  • Transforming law into a science

    November 10, 2020

    Professor Jim Greiner at the Access to Justice Lab is aiming to find out whether the practice of law can be transformed by using evidence to determine which legal interventions are safe and effective, both for individuals in the justice system and society as a whole.

  • Andrew Choi

    Andrew H. Choi ’23, Alaskan arctic warfare expert

    November 5, 2020

    Andrew H. Choi ’23 was eager for a serious challenge in his first Army posting, so he chose as radically different an environment as he could imagine: Fairbanks, Alaska.

  • Emily Miskel sitting at her computer preparing for a virtual trial

    The Jury Is Out—of the Courthouse

    October 20, 2020

    By March 17, just two weeks after Texas reported its first case of COVID-19, Judge Emily Miskel ’08 was back on the figurative bench, presiding over a one-hour virtual temporary restraining order hearing from home.

  • voting box with a lock

    Simulating responses to election disinformation

    October 14, 2020

    In an effort to combat multiple potential vectors of attack on the 2020 U.S. election, two Berkman Klein Center affiliates have published a package of “tabletop exercises,” freely available to decisionmakers and the public to simulate realistic scenarios in which disinformation threatens to disrupt the 2020 election.

  • Icon of a lock indicating digital security

    ‘We need to be more imaginative about cybersecurity than we are right now’

    October 7, 2020

    In the “good old days” of cybersecurity risk, we only had to worry about being hacked or downloading malware. But the stakes have ramped up considerably in the past decade, say Berkman Klein directors James Mickens and Jonathan Zittrain.

  • FDA headquarters in Washington DC

    Building public trust in a coronavirus vaccine

    October 6, 2020

    In an interview with Harvard Law Today, Carmel Shachar, executive director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, says that political interference in the FDA’s process for ensuring that a vaccine is both safe and effective “opens the door to a public health disaster.”

  • Cass Sunstein

    Cass Sunstein tapped to chair WHO technical advisory group

    August 24, 2020

    Cass Sunstein ’78, the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard, has been tapped by the World Health Organization to chair its Technical Advisory Group on Behavioural Insights and Sciences for Health.

  • COVID State of Play

    ‘Feeding the virus’?

    July 30, 2020

    “Confused,” “frustrating,” “fragmented,” “acute,” and “a reckoning” were just some of the ways three health care experts described the U.S. response to the coronavirus pandemic during a recent Berkman Klein virtual discussion.

  • João Marinotti ’20

    João Marinotti ’20 wants to know how the world works

    May 27, 2020

    “I’ve always had a passion for engaging in my curiosity,” says João Marinotti ‘20, a linguist turned lawyer whose work focuses on sustainability, business, property, and private law.

  • Brian Kulp

    Brian Kulp ’20: “I was blessed that law school did not pigeonhole me into any one area of law”

    May 26, 2020

    With a background in chemical engineering and business, Brian Kulp ’20 is eyeing a future in appellate law

  • Petrie-Flom 2020 student fellows

    At year-end celebration, Petrie-Flom student fellows present their independent research projects

    April 27, 2020

    Student fellows at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics recently celebrated their fellowships’ end virtually when their capstone meeting moved to Zoom due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Ecological concept in circle on white background

    Environmental law clinic pushes back against federal efforts to roll back regulations

    April 21, 2020

    Students, faculty and staff in the Harvard Law School's Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic are still hard at work, pushing back against the current administration’s attempts to undo environmental regulations approved under former President Barack Obama ’91.

  • Illustration of people being tracked by their cell phones.

    How much access to data should be permitted during the COVID-19 pandemic?

    April 14, 2020

    The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University is currently taking the lead in the effort to explore the ways data can be mined to increase understanding of COVID-19 and to fight it more efficiently.

  • Protecting rights in a global crisis

    March 25, 2020

    In a Q&A, scholars at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School raise important legal and ethical questions about health care delivery and the enactment of extraordinary public health measures in response to the ongoing epidemic.

  • United States Supreme Court in Washington DC

    Animal Law & Policy Program files amicus brief in Supreme Court challenging border wall

    March 19, 2020

    Harvard’s Animal Law & Policy Program filed its first Supreme Court brief challenging the Trump administration’s waiver of laws regarding the U.S.-Mexico border wall construction. Ashley Maiolatesi ’20 recently corresponded with Harvard Law Today about what is at stake, the specific ramifications of these waivers, and her own personal connection to the project.

  • Scales of Justice statue

    Overcoming obstacles to experiments in legal practice

    March 19, 2020

    This month, Harvard Law Professors Jim Greiner and I. Glenn Cohen teamed up with bioethics scholar Holly Fernandez Lynch to author “Overcoming obstacles to experiments in legal practice,” in which the collaborators argue in favor of randomized studies in legal research over the common practice of relying on the expertise and judgment of individuals.

  • Four students standing.

    Cravath Fellows pursue research and independent clinicals around the world 

    March 10, 2020

    During Winter Term, 12 Harvard Law School students traveled to 12 countries as Cravath International Fellows to pursue clinical placements or independent research with an international, transnational, or comparative law focus.

  • Rebecca Tushnet testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee

    Rebecca Tushnet testifies on the Digital Millennium Copyright Act

    February 17, 2020

    Rebecca Tushnet, the inaugural Frank Stanton Professor of the First Amendment and a director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society, testified before the U.S. Senate Judiciary's Subcommittee on Intellectual Property, on Feb. 11, on “The Digital Millennium Copyright Act at 22: What is it, why was it enacted, and where are we now?”

  • Cass Sunstein

    How people decide what they want to know

    January 16, 2020

    In an interview with Harvard Law Today, Cass Sunstein discussed his research, and a recently published paper on how people decide what they do or do not want to know.

  • German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier

    At Harvard Law, German President Steinmeier discusses digital technology ethics

    November 5, 2019

    On Nov. 1, German Federal President Frank-Walter Steinmeier discussed the "Ethics of Digital Transformation" at an event hosted by Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society.

  • Justice Hanan Melcer of Israel's Supreme Court.

    Israeli Supreme Court Justice on combatting propaganda in elections

    October 29, 2019

    Deputy Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Israel Hanan Melcer, who chaired Israel's Central Elections Committee, shared his experience protecting Israel's elections from online manipulation and cyber threats.

  • Innovation, Justice, and Globalization–A Celebration of J.H. Reichman

    Innovation, Justice and Globalization

    October 17, 2019

    The “Innovation, Justice and Globalization” conference, hosted by HLS professor and leading intellectual property scholar Ruth Okediji, brought international academics and policymakers to campus to discuss intellectual property issues.

  • An apple with a stethoscope, on top of a stack of books

    Harvard Food Law Clinic calls for greater nutrition education in the medical field

    October 10, 2019

    A recent report out of the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic calls for greater nutrition education in the medical field, and identifies policy approaches to increase nutrition competency of U.S-trained physicians.

  • Illustration

    A Question of Prevention

    August 6, 2019

    Calls are growing for the U.S. to lift a ban on mitochondrial replacement therapy, or MRT, a procedure developed to enable women who are at risk of passing on rare but devastating diseases to have healthy, biologically related children.

  • I. Glenn Cohen

    One thing to change: Question that status quo

    July 29, 2019

    As part of a series called Focal Point, in which the Harvard Gazette asks a range of Harvard faculty members to answer the same question, I. Glenn Cohen explains why we should scrutinize what is and then ponder what should be.

  • illustration of houses and network

    Are Americans Getting Enough Fiber?

    July 23, 2019

    The U.S. is falling behind in fiber optic technology, but cities and localities are leading the way.