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Areas of Interest

Tax Law and Policy

  • Keith Fogg

    Keith Fogg, Clinical Professor of Law and avid advocate for low-income taxpayers, retires

    June 16, 2022

    Keith Fogg, a clinical professor of law and the inaugural director of the Federal Tax Clinic at the WilmerHale Legal Services Center (LSC), is retiring this summer after seven years of dedicated service to the Harvard Law School community and to hundreds of clients in need.

  • Yellow sticky note on a laptop with the words

    A haven for taxpayers

    April 18, 2022

    Harvard Law’s Federal Tax Clinic helps low-income taxpayers shed their debts — and stress.

  • Close up of woman taking money out of a wallet

    Fed up with inflation

    January 24, 2022

    Former Federal Reserve Bank member Daniel Tarullo says the Fed has “fallen behind the curve” in raising interest rates to help tame rising inflation and “needs to play some catch-up.”

  • Man sitting at a table in front of a blue sign that says

    Weighing President Biden’s first year: The economy and monetary policy

    January 18, 2022

    Harvard Law Professor Christine Desan says the Biden administration is harnessing fiscal and monetary policy to bolster the economy, but should move faster to address climate change, crypto markets, public banking.

  • Man in black leather jacket standing in front of a vehicle for space exploration

    Does the Constitution allow a billionaire tax?

    October 28, 2021

    Would a tax on billionaires be constitutional? How would it work in practice? And would it work at all? Harvard Law School Professor Thomas J. Brennan says the answers are complicated.

  • Desk calendar on May 2021 with a red pin on the 17th which is marked

    Tax Day is here

    May 12, 2021

    Keith Fogg, clinical professor at Harvard Law School, and his students in the Federal Tax Clinic, answered questions about some common issues taxpayers are facing this pandemic year, helping low-income taxpayers, and President Biden’s proposed tax code changes.

  • Subramanian appointed chair of Program on Negotiation 1

    Subramanian, Barzuza, other Harvard Law affiliates recognized by Corporate Practice Commentator

    May 6, 2021

    Articles by Harvard Law Professor Guhan Subramanian, Visiting Professor Michal Barzuza and several HLS alumni were named the Top  Corporate and Securities Articles of 2020.

  • UPS driver making a delivery

    Helping the financially vulnerable find stability

    March 25, 2021

    Last year, Harvard Law Professor Howell Jackson and students in his FinTech class worked with a national nonprofit to help the United Parcel Service create an emergency savings program for 90,000 of its nonunion workers.

  • David Cope

    David Cope: 1948-2021

    March 5, 2021

    A brilliant intellect and devoted, compassionate teacher, Harvard Law School Lecturer on Law David Cope taught at the school for more than 20 years.

  • GameStop storefront

    What the GameStop surge means for Wall Street

    February 3, 2021

    Professor Jesse Fried ’92, a leading expert in executive compensation and venture capital, helps make sense of what happened with the GameStop surge on Wall Street and points to the events’ potential long-term implications for the practice of short-selling.

  • President Donald Trump

    Not ‘manifestly criminal’

    September 29, 2020

    Harvard Law Today spoke Monday with tax experts Keith Fogg and Thomas Brennan about the New York Times' report on President Donald J. Trump’s taxes.

  • $1,000 promissory note from the Bank of the United States

    McCulloch v. Maryland: Two centuries later

    September 23, 2019

    On the 200th anniversary of McCulloch v. Maryland, HLS Professor Mark Tushnet reflects on the 1819 case that paved the way for the modern administrative state and established the supremacy of federal over state law.

  • JET-Powered Learning

    August 21, 2019

    1L January Experiential Term courses focus on skills-building, collaboration and self-reflection

  • Illustration of two people in judges robes holding a funnel with the words we the people flowing through them

    Faculty Books in Brief: Summer 2019

    June 19, 2019

    A single person cannot change a social norm; it requires a movement from people who disapprove of the norm, writes Sunstein. He explores how those movements, ranging from the fight for LGBTQ rights to white nationalism, take shape and effect change.

  • Robert Sitkoff

    Sitkoff, HLS authors contribute to the study of fiduciary law

    April 29, 2019

    Harvard Law School Professor Robert H. Sitkoff has co-edited The Oxford Handbook of Fiduciary Law, a handbook, slated for release today, that features important contributions from Sitkoff and from several other HLS scholars to the growing field of fiduciary law throughout its 48 chapters.

  • Putting compassion into action

    Putting compassion into action

    April 12, 2019

    On April 5, Harvard Law School's Legal Services Center celebrated its 40th Anniversary of training more than 4,000 attorneys and law students and providing pro bono civil legal services to thousands of Greater Boston’s most vulnerable residents.

  • Linda Chatman Thomsen ’79

    Linda Chatman Thomsen ’79

    January 29, 2019

    The first woman to serve as the director of the Division of Enforcement at the Securities and Exchange Commission, Linda Chatman Thomsen ’79 led the Enron investigation and expanded enforcement of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. She is now a partner in Davis Polk’s litigation department.

  • photo of Hal Scott

    ‘Quid Ita?’: Hal Scott’s Questions and Answers

    January 29, 2019

    Harvard Law Professor Hal S. Scott was in his element, thundering up and down the aisles of a classroom in Wasserstein Hall and challenging each of his 70 Capital Markets Regulation students to match his enthusiasm and curiosity. After 43 years on the HLS faculty, Scott taught his final class at the school before retiring last spring. What is the best process, he asked, for ensuring that regulations for the financial system achieve their intended effect?