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Latest from Julia Collins

  • Dariusz Mioduski

    A conversation with Dariusz Mioduski ’90

    August 4, 2017

    Polish-born lawyer and businessman Darius Mioduski ’90 applied to Harvard Law School not having known English five years earlier. That hopeful step led him on an adventurous career path, from starting out in international M&A and project finance, to his present role as part owner of Poland’s top football club.

  • Cincinnati skyline at night

    Solutions from Cincinnati

    May 10, 2016

    Now in its 14th year, a compact on policing in Cincinnati, Ohio, focused on building strong police-community relationships is a lauded model nationwide. John Cranley ’99, now the city’s mayor, was there from the start of the landmark agreement known as the Collaborative.

  • Gene Park

    From the NYPD to HLS

    May 10, 2016

    Gene Park has found that his greatest challenge this year has been making the transition from decisive cop mode to contemplative student.

  • HLS Clinical students

    Meeting at Cops’ Corner

    May 10, 2016

    In just one decade, Everett, Massachusetts, once a predominantly white city, has become the most racially and ethnically diverse in the commonwealth. Building communication between police officers and local youth is a priority for Chief of the Everett Police Department Steven A. Mazzie, who is white, as are 86 percent of his officers. Last fall he invited a team of HLS students from the Harvard Negotiation & Mediation Clinical Program to Everett for an impartial assessment.

  • Containing Contagion

    Containing Contagion

    May 4, 2016

    According to HLS Professor Hal Scott, nearly eight years after the 2008 crisis, the U.S. financial system is inadequately protected and more at risk than ever. He sounds the alarm in a new book, “Connectedness and Contagion: Protecting the Financial System from Panics,” forthcoming early this summer from MIT Press.

  • All-Star Team on a Winning Streak

    October 5, 2015

    Corporate governance scholars at Harvard Law keep putting up great numbers.

  • Certain Change: How the Roberts Court is revising constitutional law

    November 24, 2014

    Laurence Tribe discusses some of the implications of the decisions of nine men and women with regard to gay marriage, gun rights, N.S.A. surveillance, health care, emerging threats to privacy, immigration and more.

  • Tomiko Brown-Nagin

    Brown-Nagin on the Unfinished Business of Civil Rights

    May 15, 2014

    The author of the award-winning book “Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement,“ sees education as the civil rights frontier.

  • Hong Kong

    Destination: Asia

    January 1, 2014

    In June, a delegation from Harvard Law School led by Dean Martha Minow embarked on a 15-day, five-stop visit to East Asia and to the fore of fast-moving developments and challenges across the region.

  • Strange New Rules of a Cool War

    July 2, 2013

    After the global meltdown of 2008, while the United States was distracted by economic recovery and disengaging its troops from Iraq and Afghanistan, a new war quietly began. Many Americans have yet to realize the world-changing implications of the conflict between the United States and China that is the focus of Harvard Law Professor Noah Feldman’s new book, “Cool War: The Future of Global Competition” (Random House).

  • After Death Camps, a Force for Life

    July 1, 2012

    Human rights lawyer Thomas Buergenthal LL.M. ’61 S.J.D. ’68, author of “A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy,” wrote that his experience as a Holocaust survivor made him a better judge. "I understood, not only intellectually but emotionally, what it is like to be victim of human rights violations. I could, after all, feel it in my bones."

  • In new book, Benkler makes the case for “prosocial” systems design

    October 19, 2011

    For generations, the assumption that selfishness drives human behavior has shaped the design of social systems in which we live and work. In his new book “The Penguin and the Leviathan: The Triumph of Cooperation Over Self-Interest,” Harvard Law Professor Yochai Benkler ’94 rejects this assumption as a “myth” and proposes an alternative, refreshingly optimistic model that asserts our human traits of cooperation and collaboration.

  • Hard Hats Required: The risky business of repairing the U.S. financial system

    July 1, 2010

    Two years after the government bailout of Bear Stearns set off the first shock wave, the Bulletin interviewed HLS faculty and alumni on what went wrong, on where the greatest dangers remain in our financial system and what to do about them.

  • A View from the Brink

    January 1, 2010

    When the U.S. financial system came excruciatingly close to collapse, Rodge Cohen was suddenly the man to call.

  • Summer 2009

    Not on His Watch

    July 1, 2009

    In the global financial crises, will Robert Zoellick '81 hold rich nations accountable to the developing world? Bank on it.

  • The Captain of the US v. Microsoft

    September 28, 2000

    Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson '64 is a blunt, plain-speaking, and physically imposing man who knows how to run a tight ship. From the moment he drew judging duties for United States v. Microsoft, Jackson was determined to keep one of the 20th century's largest antitrust cases running swiftly and on course.

  • Project Aids Countries in Transition

    July 18, 2000

    With the support of Professor Philip Heymann '60, a joint Harvard project seeks to foster cooperation and progress for countries in transition.

  • Brennemans on the Bench

    June 18, 2000

    Juvenile court Judge Frederica Brenneman '53 serves as inspirations and adviser for the hit television drama Judging Amy, starring her daughter, Amy Brenneman.

  • Gerald Frug’s Alternative Vision of Urban America

    April 25, 2000

    The Bulletin interviews Professor Gerald Frug about his new book which gives readers a sense of how the incentive system built into local government law has helped generate suburban sprawl.

  • Elizabeth Bartholet

    Elizabeth Bartholet Challenges the Child Welfare System

    April 25, 2000

    The Bulletin interviews Elizabeth Bartholet about her recent book, which looks at how policies affect children victimized by abuse and neglect.

  • The Double Life of George Abrams ’57

    April 25, 2000

    Even as a Law School student, Abrams was drawn to the world of art. He has divided has time between lawyering and collecting, building with his wife, Maida, one of the world's preeminent collections of seventeenth-century Dutch drawings. Recently, this famous collecting duo made a dazzling gift to the Fogg.

  • The Soldier’s Secretary

    April 25, 2000

    Ever on the move, Louis Caldera ’86 (’87), the 17th Secretary of the Army and its top communicator, lends his ear to enlisted men and women worldwide, communicating the changing mission of an Army in transformation.

  • Day and Night in N.Y.C.

    September 25, 1999

    Banker and community builder Deborah Wright '84, Parks Commissioner Henry J. Stern '57 and longtime Legal Aid lawyer Stephen Pokart ’65 all make their living in N.Y.C.

  • At Large in L.A.

    September 25, 1999

    Belinda Smith Walker ’71, executive director of Girls and Gangs (G&G), and partners in law and public activism Stephen English ’75 and Molly Munger ’74 are all Harvard alumni residing in L.A.

  • An Afternoon in D.C.

    September 25, 1999

    Wilma A. Lewis ’81 is the new U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia.

  • Building in Cyberspace 3

    Building in Cyberspace

    June 24, 1999

    The intrepid crew of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

  • Taking on the Unfinished Business of the Twentieth Century

    June 24, 1999

    For several years now, Eizenstat has been deeply involved in what he calls "the unfinished business of the twentieth century." For him that business is accounting for the astonishing array of assets looted by the Nazis, and securing some long-delayed justice for Holocaust survivors and victims’ families.

  • Writing

    Writing “The Good Black”

    April 26, 1999

    How two HLS roommates became author and subject.

  • Celebration 45

    February 25, 1999

    Since the first alumnae of 1953, more than 5,000 women have claimed their place at HLS. Hundreds came back to the School in November to applaud Attorney General Janet Reno '63 as she accepted the Celebration 45 Award, and to connect with the other remarkable women of Harvard Law.

  • From the ballpark to the box office

    April 26, 1998

    More than a dozen years ago, student and alumni interest in the role law plays in sports prompted Professor Paul Weiler LL.M. '65 to introduce an HLS seminar called Sports and the Law. Since then, matters such as labor disputes between players and team owners and the impact of rules requiring equivalent college athletics programs for men and women students have been regular fare in Weiler's classroom.