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Antonin Scalia

  • Illustration of a Larry Lessig in the foreground with pieces of the U.S. constitution behind him and over red, white and blue stripes

    Translating the Constitution with Fidelity

    January 7, 2020

    One new book by Lawrence Lessig explains a core virtue of the Supreme Court; a second explores America’s perilous politics—which put that virtue at serious risk

  • A panel of HLS Supreme Court Bobbleheads, from left: G. Breyer ’64, David H. Souter ’66, Louis D. Brandeis LL.B. 1877, Ruth Bader Ginsburg ’56-’58, John G. Roberts Jr. ’79

    Collector’s Items

    January 7, 2020

    The Harvard Law School Library offers a treasure-trove for legal historians. If one wanted to peruse, for example, a copy of the first printed collection of English statutes from the 15th century, there it would be. Yet, as three recent acquisitions demonstrate, the library also presents the lighter side of the law, with items that reveal the humor and personalities behind the cases and legal decisions that make history.

  • 1982 Sandra Day O’Connor Ames on the bench

    Supreme Viewing: A Deep Bench

    January 30, 2019

    Although arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court are not video-recorded, you can watch many of its justices questioning oralists and presiding over cases—within the State of Ames. Visit Harvard Law School’s archive of video recordings of the final rounds of the Ames Moot Court Competition.

  • ‘Without the Pretense of Legislative Intent’: John Manning delivers Scalia lecture

    March 13, 2017

    On March 6, John Manning ’85, Harvard Law School deputy dean and Bruce Bromley Professor of Law, delivered a talk, "Without the Pretense of Legislative Intent," as part of the Scalia lecture series at HLS.

  • Antonin Scalia

    Scalia family donates late justice’s papers to Harvard Law School Library

    March 6, 2017

    The family of the late Antonin Scalia ’60, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, has announced that it will donate his papers to the Harvard Law School Library.

  • Harvard Law School reflects on the legacy of Justice Scalia

    March 1, 2016

    On Feb. 24, a panel of Harvard Law School professors, all of whom had personal or professional connections to the late Justice Antonin Scalia, gathered to remember his life and work.

  • Antonin Scalia ’60 (1936-2016)

    February 14, 2016

    "Justice Scalia will be remembered as one of the most influential jurists in American history -- he changed how the Court approaches statutory interpretation, and in countless areas introduced new ways of thinking about the Constitution and the role of the Court that will remain important for years to come."

  • In Scalia lecture, Kagan discusses statutory interpretation

    November 25, 2015

    On Nov. 17, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Elena Kagan ’86, former dean of Harvard Law School, discussed statutory interpretation in a conversation with Professor John Manning ’85 as part of the Scalia lecture series at Harvard Law School.

  • A Supreme Opera

    October 5, 2015

    “Scalia/Ginsburg,” a comic opera by Derrick Wang, had its world premiere this summer in Virginia. Among those in the audience for the premiere was Justice Ginsburg herself.

  • From politics to pop music: A look back at fall 2014 at HLS

    December 23, 2014

    A former NBA All Star turned humanitarian. Supreme Court justices. Student protests. Take a look at some highlights of the people who visited and events that took place this semester at Harvard Law School.

  • Illustration

    HLS Authors: Selected alumni books

    October 2, 2012

    “Client Science: Advice for Lawyers on Counseling Clients through Bad News and Other Legal Realities,” by Marjorie Corman Aaron ’81 (Oxford). No one likes to deliver bad news—attorneys included. But oftentimes providing honest and difficult advice is a crucial part of the job, and Aaron offers her own advice on how best to do it.

  • Andrew Kaufman

    Duck Bind

    July 1, 2004

    Justice Antonin Scalia '60 went duck hunting with Vice President Dick Cheney three weeks after the Supreme Court agreed to hear Cheney's appeal of a lower court order that he turn over records of the closed energy task force meetings he held in 2001.