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timeline

  • Organization-based

    Organizational fellowships are defined positions within existing organizations, usually for a period of one to two years. Applicants do not need to develop their own project. Students or graduates apply to these fellowships in a manner similar to a typical job application process. An organization usually offers one or maybe a few fellowships each year.

  • Project-based

    Project-based fellowships help fund projects that serve unmet legal needs. Usually, applicants must propose their own projects, usually in conjunction with an existing organization, but in some cases candidates may apply for support to start a new organization. The Skadden and Equal Justice Works fellowships are examples of project-based fellowships.

  • Traveling

    There are a variety of post-graduate fellowships that allow recipients to work on international issues in the U.S. and abroad. Some of these are not legal fellowships per se but are good opportunities to work on legally-related issues through nongovernmental organizations, universities, and, in some cases, U.S. government agencies.

  • Teaching

    Teaching fellowships are designed to offer the graduate the ability to learn how to teach law in a clinical setting or work on legal research projects. Strong academics are a must and most require relevant experience post-law school. Current bar membership may also be a requirement.

  • Entrepreneurial

    Entrepreneurial fellowships help fund projects that serve unmet legal needs. Applicants must apply for support to start a new organization.

  • Research and writing