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Twenty-four Harvard Law School students have been awarded 2020 Chayes International Public Service Fellowships for work with organizations based in 12 countries. Due to the coronavirus pandemic and limitations on travel, some of the 2020 Chayes Fellows are conducting their work in the United States or remotely. The Fellows are listed below, with their summer placements and biographical information submitted by the students.

Allison Beeman, Commission for International Justice and Accountability, Europe

Allison is a first-year student at Harvard Law School. She graduated from Bowdoin College with a B.A. in government and legal studies with a concentration in international relations and from the Fletcher School at Tufts University with a master of arts in law and diplomacy (M.A.L.D.), where she studied conflict and international law with a regional focus on the Middle East. Prior to law school, she lived in Jordan, where she worked for a start-up e-commerce bookstore, a Middle East news agency, a humanitarian research consultancy, and a refugee resettlement legal aid organization. Next year, Allison will serve as a Co-President of the Harvard Law & International Development Society and as a Submissions Editor for the Harvard Human Rights Journal. She is also involved in HLS Advocates for Human Rights and the Harvard International Law Journal. This summer, she will work on war crimes investigations as an intern with the Commission for International Justice and Accountability.

Chetna Beriwala, Greater Boston Legal Services, Massachusetts

Chetna is a first year student from India. She graduated from the London School of Economics, where she received a B.Sc. in international relations and history. During her time in university, she discovered an interest in international law. After graduating, she spent four months volunteering with asylum seekers at the British Red Cross in London. After that, she interned with the Office of the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court in The Hague. She then spent a few months interning for a legal non-profit in India, providing representation to asylum seekers as they made their case for refugee status at the UNHCR. At HLS, Chetna is involved with the Harvard Immigration Project and HLS Advocates for Human Rights. This summer, she will be interning with the Immigration Unit of Greater Boston Legal Services. Her work will focus on the international aspects of asylum seekers’ claims.

 Sam Bookman, International IDEA, Tunisia

Sam is a S.J.D. (doctoral) student who focuses his research on comparative constitutional law. He clerked for Judge Jan-Marie Doogue, Chief Judge of the District Court of New Zealand, before completing the LL.M. program at Harvard Law School in 2017-2018. Sam has worked extensively with the Harvard Human Rights Program, as a student clinician, project leader for HLS Advocates for Human Rights, and research assistant. In 2018-2019, Sam was a Harvard Law School Public Service Venture Fellow with the Cyrus R. Vance Center for International Justice, a New York-based human rights NGO. His work has been published in journals in New Zealand, Canada, and Australia. This summer, Sam will be working with the Tunis-based office of International IDEA, an intergovernmental organization which works internationally to support and strengthen democratic institutions. While at International IDEA, Sam will work primarily on projects related to constitutional reform in Sudan and Yemen.

Todd Carney, Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization, Belgium

Todd is a second-year student at Harvard Law School. He holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and public communications. He has also worked in digital media in New York City and Washington, DC. Todd has an interest in the rule of law in Eastern Europe and has written several pieces for Lawfare, Opinio Juris and other legal blogs on the matter. At HLS, he is also involved in the Harvard International Law Journal, the Rule of Law Society and the European Law Association. This summer, Todd will be interning at the Unrepresented Nations & Peoples Organization (UNPO), where he will work on litigation concerning self-determination.

Lauren Deutsch, Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa, France

Lauren is a first-year student from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She graduated from The University of Alabama, where she received B.S. and M.S. degrees in operations management with a specialization in supply chain. After graduating, she lived in Avignon, France, where she taught primary school English and improved her French language skills. Her interest in the intersection of law, business, and human rights brought her to HLS. At HLS, Lauren is a board member of the Association for Human Rights and Business and a senior editor of the Harvard Business Law Review. She was also a team leader for a project with the Harvard Law & International Development Society. Lauren will be working for the Platform to Protect Whistleblowers in Africa this summer. She will assist with legal research, analysis, and investigative tasks focused on protecting whistleblowers and reducing corruption in African countries.

William Edin, Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the United Nations, New York

William is a first-year student from Stockholm, Sweden. He graduated from Idaho State University, where he obtained a B.A. in economics and an M.B.A. in finance, while playing on the men’s tennis team. William is interested in a wide range of issues, including foreign relations law, international human rights law, and counterterrorism law. Prior to law school, William played professional tennis and worked for a German beverage start-up, where he was responsible for the company’s expansion to the Scandinavian market. He is fluent in English, Swedish, Norwegian, and German. At Harvard, William is involved in the Harvard International Law Journal and the European Law Association. He was also part of the HLS parody cast. This summer, William will be working at the Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the United Nations. His projects will include work with the International Criminal Court, and specific assignments on the Liechtenstein Initiative for Financials Sector Action against Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking.

Kimberly Everett, Clooney Foundation for Justice, California

Kimberly is a first-year student from Mobile, Alabama. She graduated from The University of Alabama at Birmingham with a B.A. in economics and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government with a master’s degree in public policy. After HKS, she served as a Foreign Service Officer for the U.S. Department of State as a Pickering Fellow, completing tours in China, Pakistan, and Turkey as a political officer and refugee coordinator. At HLS, Kimberly has joined the Harvard Civil Rights–Civil Liberties Law Review and the Women in Washington committee of the Women’s Law Association. This summer, she will be working at the Clooney Foundation for Justice as part of the Trial Watch team. Her focus will be on monitoring and reporting on the trials of vulnerable people around the world.

Erika Holmberg, Greater Boston Legal Services, Massachusetts

Erika is a first-year student interested in international law, human rights, immigration and refugee law, and government policy and regulation. Originally from Los Angeles, she graduated from Columbia University in 2016 with a B.A. in political science and East Asian studies, writing her thesis on the obstacles that prevent the UN High Commissioner for Refugees from protecting North Korean defectors in China. In college, she interned at the UN World Humanitarian Summit Secretariat and the New York Civil Liberties Union. Before law school, she worked as a paralegal at the Antitrust Division of the Department of Justice. During her first year at HLS, she served as an article editor for the Harvard International Law Journal and was involved in HLS Advocates for Human Rights. Next year, she will serve on the board of the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association. This summer, she will work at Greater Boston Legal Services’ Immigration Unit. Her work will include researching country conditions and assisting GBLS attorneys in representing individuals seeking asylum or protection from domestic abuse before Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the Immigration Court, the Board of Immigration Appeals, and the First Circuit.

Hannah James, The Sentry, Washington, DC

Hannah is a first-year student from Los Angeles, California. She graduated from the University of Southern California with a B.A. in International relations and global business. Prior to attending law school, she worked as a paralegal at the Department of Justice Criminal Division in the Securities and Financial Fraud section. At HLS, Hannah is involved in HLS Advocates for Human Rights, the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and the Women’s Law Association. This summer Hannah will be working for The Sentry, an NGO working to expose the illicit financing of war crimes and transnational violence in East and Central Africa in an effort to promote peace, human rights, and good governance.

Stanislaw Krawiecki, Minority Rights Group International, United Kingdom

Stanisław is a first-year student from Poland. He graduated from University College London in the UK, where he obtained a B.A. in history, politics and economics, writing a thesis on the effects of the 2010 constitutional change in Kyrgyzstan. While at UCL, he interned at Amnesty International and taught chess in primary schools. He is passionate about various strands of international law, human rights, international dispute resolution; and comparative constitutional law. Specifically, he is interested in how individual and community rights are safeguarded and how their voice can underpin the contemporary global legal order. At Harvard, this year Stanisław will be one of the editors-in-chief for Volume 34 of the Harvard Human Rights Journal and is also involved in HLS Advocates for Human Rights and the HLS soccer team. This summer, he was supposed to intern at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights in San José, Costa Rica, but because of the COVID-19 crisis, he had to regroup. Instead, he will get strategic litigation experience at Minority Rights Group International, a London-based organization advocating for the rights of ethnic, national, religious, and linguistic minorities and indigenous peoples around the world.

Jung Hyun (Monica) Lee, Advocates for Public Interest Law, Korea

Monica is a first-year student from Seoul, Korea, but she has also lived in Toronto, Kansas, and Chicago. She is interested in international human rights law and refugee law. She graduated magna cum laude from Northwestern University in 2019 with a B.A. in psychology and international studies. As an undergraduate, Monica worked to support the human rights of North Korean refugees living in South Korea and published a paper on the psychology behind discrimination against North Korean refugees. At HLS, Monica is involved in the Harvard International Law Journal and the Harvard International Arbitration Law Students Association. This summer, she will be working for Advocates for Public Interest Law (APIL) in Korea, an NGO dedicated to supporting the human rights of victims of human trafficking, refugees, and unjustly detained migrants.

Patrick Maxwell, International Rescue Committee, New York

Patrick is a concurrent JD/MA student at Harvard Law School and the Fletcher School at Tufts University. Previous to law school, he worked in peacebuilding and humanitarian protection for four years in conflict zones, including the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. His professional interests include mediation, negotiation, the law of armed conflict, and engagement with armed non-state actors. This is Patrick’s second summer as a Chayes Fellow; in the summer of 2018, he traveled to the DRC to research and write a report on humanitarian principles and access negotiations. In his spare time, Patrick plays a lot of board games.

Amre Metwally, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, France

Amre is a first-year student interested in international human rights law, law and technology, and online privacy and censorship issues. While obtaining his B.A. at the University of Michigan, he conducted fieldwork on identity politics and political mobilization in Arab and Muslim diasporic communities across western Europe and the United States. After graduating, Amre lived and worked in Turkey as a Fulbright Scholar. After returning from Turkey, he worked at an international human rights non-profit and later worked at YouTube, where he was the Policy and Enforcement Manager for political extremism issues facing the platform. He also led a project at the company to better preserve public interest content related to the Syrian conflict from erroneous, automatic takedowns. At HLS, Amre is involved with the Middle Eastern Law Students Association, the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, and the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology. This summer, he will intern with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development in their Artificial Intelligence Policy Observatory, specializing in the intersection of international human rights, regulatory efforts, and AI technology.

Julian Morimoto, Ateneo Human Rights Center, Ateneo de Manila Univerisity, Philippines

Julian is a second-year student from Honolulu, Hawaii. He is interested in international law and human rights. Before law school, Julian studied mathematics at Case Western Reserve University. At HLS, he was co-president of HLS First Class and the HLS Global South Dialogue, and a project leader for HLS Advocates for Human Rights. This summer, he is working for Ateneo de Manila University’s Ateneo Human Rights Center. He will be focusing on a range of human rights issues relevant to the Philippines and Southeast Asia.

Ata Nalbantoglu, New Markets Lab, Washington, DC

Ata is a first-year student interested in international development, systemic justice and comparative legal institutions. He graduated with highest academic distinction from Washington University in St. Louis and earned first class honors from the London School of Economics. At WashU and LSE, Ata focused on political theory and international legal systems. Before coming to law school, he spent time at APCO Worldwide and the Education Reform Initiative where he worked on new market entry and access to education issues. At HLS, Ata is on the board of the Harvard Association for Law and Business and the Middle Eastern Law Students Association. This summer he will join New Markets Lab and work on comparative economic, legal, and regulatory issues to advance sustainable economic development through law.

Mira Naseer, Minority Rights Group International, United Kingdom

Mira is a first-year student from Pakistan and Hong Kong. She is interested in international human rights law and immigration and refugee law. Mira graduated from the University of Pennsylvania, where she received a B.A. in international relations. She also has a MPhil in public policy from the University of Cambridge. Prior to law school, Mira began her career at Morgan Stanley, working in the sales and trading division, and has more recently worked with Amnesty International in their refugee and migrant rights team. During her first year at HLS, Mira was involved with the Harvard Immigration Project, the South Asian Law Students Association, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal. Next year, she will be a student attorney with the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic. This summer, Mira will be working at Minority Rights Group International in their strategic litigation team. Her work will primarily focus on cases before the African Commission related to violations of the rights of minorities and indigenous communities.

Sherin Nassar, American Civil Liberties Union of Texas

Sherin is a first-year student with a background in international affairs and economics. She previously worked at the U.S. Department of State in the Bureau of Economics, where she focused on corporate social responsibility and how to improve human rights in American supply chains based in both the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Relevant stakeholders included international NGOs, such as Earthrights, and Fortune 500 US companies, such as Chevron, Pepsico and Starwood Hotels. She completed her undergraduate degree at The George Washington University and her master’s degree at SOAS, University of London. Prior to starting law school, she worked for White and Case LLP in their Capital Markets practice in London, where she focused on high yield bonds and sovereign debt restructuring. She is fluent in Arabic, is attempting to cement her Spanish, and is both a fried chicken enthusiast and ice breaker question connoisseur.

Ji Soo Janet Park, United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL), Austria

Janet is a first-year student with an interest in international law and diplomacy, cross-cultural exchange, and public service. She attended Columbia University, where she received a B.A. in East Asian studies in 2016. After college, Janet spent her summer in New York City as an intern for the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations, attending various meetings and events at UN Headquarters and drafting memos on a number of topics involving the UNGA Sixth Committee. During the internship, she attended the 49th session of UNCITRAL, where the agenda items ranged from online dispute resolution to the finalization and adoption of a draft Model Law on Secured Transactions, and grew interested in its work and mission. Prior to law school, she also worked at the U.S. Department of Justice in the Antitrust Division and in the Office of Legal Policy in Washington, DC. At Harvard, Janet is involved in the Harvard International Law Journal, the Harvard Law & International Development Society, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, the Asian Pacific American Law Students Association, and the Women’s Law Association. This summer, she will be completing an internship with UNCITRAL, working with the Secretariat to conduct legal research and comparative analysis of national and international commercial laws and regulations, as well as analysis of case law on UNCITRAL documents.

Krupa Patel, Rights Watch UK (Rights and Security International), United Kingdom

Krupa is a first-year student from Des Plaines, Illinois. She attended the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she graduated magna cum laude in 2016 with a B.A. in English, philosophy, and psychology. While in college, she volunteered for the International Rescue Committee and taught through a fellowship with Generation Teach. After UIUC, she worked for a year as an editor for Cambridge Educational Services. She then returned to school to pursue a JD and a PhD in philosophy as part of Harvard’s joint degree program. She spent her first two years in the philosophy department completing coursework and researching issues in moral and political philosophy. Now at HLS, she is involved in the Harvard Human Rights Journal, the Harvard Law and Policy Review, HLS Advocates for Human Rights, and First Class. She is also a fellow at the Derek Bok Center. This summer, she will be interning for Rights Watch (UK), soon to be renamed Rights and Security International, an NGO based in London conducting legal and policy research on repatriation policies in western Europe, human rights issues in the context of counterterrorism, and government responses to COVID-19.

Noopur Sen, Asylum Protection Center, Serbia

Noopur is a joint degree student pursuing a master in public administration in international development (MPA/ID) at the Harvard Kennedy School and a JD at Harvard Law School. She was born and raised across Delhi and Mumbai, India, and graduated with a B.A. in economics (Honours) from the University of Delhi. Prior to graduate school, Noopur worked with IDinsight, an international development organization focused on using data and evidence to improve the impact of social programs across the developing world. At IDinsight, she worked on research and advisory engagements with state and national governments, nonprofits and international foundations in the areas of education, gender and governance. Last summer, Noopur worked with the World Bank on an impact evaluation of court-annexed mediation services in Nairobi, Kenya. At Harvard Law School, she has been involved with the Harvard Immigration Project, HLS Advocates for Human Rights and the Women’s Law Association. She is interested in the intersection of economics, international development and law.

Zarka Shabir, Reprieve, United Kingdom

Zarka Shabir is a first-year international student, originally from Kashmir. She graduated from Sarah Lawrence College in 2017, where she obtained a B.A. in history. After Sarah Lawrence, she worked as a paralegal with the Appeals Division at the New York County District Attorney’s Office for a year, and then at a research organization in New Delhi, before coming back to the United States for law school. At HLS, Zarka is an online editor for the Harvard Human Rights Journal, and is involved with the Prison Legal Assistance Project, the HLS Forum Team, and the Coalition for International Students and Global Affairs. This summer, Zarka will be working remotely with the Life After Guantanamo Project at Reprieve.

Maria Smith, Digital Freedom Fund, Germany

Maria is a first-year student from Kansas City, Missouri, and is interested in the intersection of technology and international human rights law. She graduated from Harvard with a B.A. in economics. After college, she worked at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society on issues of technology deployment and social and economic justice. Maria also consulted on financial structures for fiber-optic and energy infrastructure in small towns. She made her first documentary, “One Nation, Disconnected,” in cooperation with the Harvard Law Documentary Studio, followed by a four-part series “Dividing Lines,” with support from the Ford Foundation, to expose the impacts and forces behind America’s stark digital divides. Prior to beginning law school, Maria worked at the Digital Freedom Fund in Berlin, Germany, to advance digital rights across Europe through strategic litigation. At HLS, she is involved with the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology and the Women’s Law Association. This summer, Maria will be re-joining the team at the international Digital Freedom Fund to challenge harmful impacts of technology (e.g., algorithmic decision-making, big data, surveillance, etc.) on human rights and democratic values.

Gina Starfield, Al Otro Lado, Mexico

Gina is a first-year student interested in human rights, children’s rights, and immigration and refugee law. Originally from Massachusetts, Gina graduated from Yale University with a B.A. in political science and ethnicity, race & migration. While in college, she studied in Kigali, Rwanda and interned with The Legal Resources Centre in Cape Town, South Africa and The International Organization for Migration in Geneva, Switzerland. After undergrad, she completed an M.Sc. in refugee and forced migration studies at Oxford, where she researched strategic litigation in the UK and its ability to forge safe and legal pathways to protection for Syrian unaccompanied child asylum seekers in Calais, France. Gina then worked as a paralegal for two years in the Special Litigation and Law Reform Unit of the Juvenile Rights Practice at 4The Legal Aid Society (NYC). At HLS, Gina is involved with the Harvard Immigration Project, the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, and the Harvard Human Rights Journal. This summer, she will be working for Al Otro Lado and their Border Rights Project based in Tijuana, Mexico.

Rachel Westrate, Environmental Defense Fund, New York

Rachel is a second-year student from Park City, Utah. She is interested in international climate law and policy, with a specific focus on the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. She graduated magna cum laude from Washington University in St. Louis in 2016 with degrees in Environmental Policy and English Literature. As an undergraduate, Rachel served as a student delegate to the UNFCCC and as president of the international environmental student group. After graduating, she worked at the World Resources Institute in Washington, DC as a research assistant to Dr. Andrew Steer, President & CEO. At Harvard, Rachel is the editor-in-chief of the Harvard Environmental Law Review, a research assistant with the Arctic Initiative at the Kennedy School and the Environmental and Energy Law Program, a student contributor on climate and national security to the Lawfare Blog, and active in the Environmental Law Society. This summer, she will be working at the Environmental Defense Fund with the Multilateral Climate Strategy team.