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Areas of Interest

Technology Law and Policy

  • Electric vehicle parking space marked with a green stencil of the letters

    Current electric vehicles subsidies fail to reduce overall emissions, says Harvard Law study

    April 7, 2022

    Subsidies offered by the federal government for the purchase of new electric vehicles (EVs) may actually increase total greenhouse gas emissions without similar aid for secondhand buyers, concludes a new study led by Ashley Nunes, Ph.D., a fellow at Harvard Law School’s Labor and Worklife Program.

  • Gorbachev and Bush at White House Summit

    ‘There was no promise not to enlarge NATO’

    March 16, 2022

    Robert Zoellick, the U.S. diplomat who helped negotiate the end of the Cold War, says Vladimir Putin’s claims about Ukraine are part of a disinformation campaign.

  • Finger pressing a button labeled

    Algorithm nation

    March 14, 2022

    A Harvard Law School reading group debates how the law should manage self-driving cars, A.I.-generated art, and other algorithmic technology.

  • Crowd of people in New York City's Times Square carrying a large Ukranian flag

    ‘We Ukrainians know Putin all too well’

    February 28, 2022

    For international law expert Svitlana Starosvit LL.M. ’13 S.J.D. ’22, Russia's military assault on Ukraine is horrifying yet unsurprising because, she says, “We Ukrainians know Putin all too well."

  • An illustration of an open bank vault with digital currency inside represented by small white squares

    The Crypto of the Realm

    January 31, 2022

    A Harvard Law class explores possibilities for a U.S. central bank digital currency, which would be sheltered from the wild fluctuations in value for which crypto is known.

  • Black and white photo of a group of people at a conference table

    To Infinity and Beyond

    January 31, 2022

    Since 2007, Gabriel Swiney has served in the State Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser. His work in space law, he says, has allowed him to merge his experience and his passion to help future generations chart a safer, fairer path to the stars.

  • Colorful illustration featuring mushrooms a microscope and other scientific devices and a man walking along a path

    Reassessing Psychedelics

    January 31, 2022

    A new Harvard Law initiative examines the legal and ethical aspects of therapeutic psychedelics

  • An illustration of a large transparent globe with DNA strands floating inside as two scientist and two others observe.

    Faculty Books in Brief: Winter 2022

    January 31, 2022

    A wide range of books by faculty, from a collection of essays on the ethics of consumer genetic testing to a look at the fate of constitutional institutions in populist regimes to a delightful children's book by a legal philosopher

  • Susan Hendrickson

    Berkman Klein Center welcomes Susan Hendrickson as executive director

    December 1, 2021

    The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University has announced the appointment of Susan Hendrickson ’93 as its new executive director.

  • Burning smartphone

    ‘The algorithm has primacy over media … over each of us, and it controls what we do’

    November 18, 2021

    Social media’s business model of personalized virality is incompatible with democracy, agreed experts at a recent Harvard Law School discussion on the state of democracy.

  • Pile of folded newspapers

    Protecting the media to protect democracy

    November 16, 2021

    At a Harvard Law School Library Book Talk, Martha Minow, along with Vicki Jackson and Nikolas Bowie, discussed why the press is in danger — and how to save it.

  • Woman talking into a microphone

    Is it time to swipe left on social media?

    October 12, 2021

    Leaked revelations about Instagram’s impact on teens have united Republicans and Democrats in considering legal reforms, say Harvard Law School scholars.

  • David French

    Moderating free speech

    September 27, 2021

    At a Federalist Society event, David French ’94 says government “should keep its hands off” social media and argues that support for free speech is waning across the political spectrum.

  • Illustration showing alternative clean energy sources: hydro energy, wind energy, geothermal energy, and solar energy.

    Electric slide

    September 21, 2021

    Helping key players across Massachusetts — including the City of Boston and environmental nonprofits — reduce greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 is a focus for the Emmett Environmental Law & Policy Clinic at Harvard Law School.

  • Fleet of autonomous vehicles

    Robocabs could make climate change worse, say researchers at Harvard, MIT

    August 24, 2021

    A new study led by Dr. Ashley Nunes, a fellow at the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School, concluded that, counterintuitively, fleets of electric, autonomous taxis could dramatically increase energy consumption and emissions that contribute to climate change — not reduce them.

  • President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin shaking hands

    Is the U.S. in a cyber war?

    July 14, 2021

    Harvard Law Today recently spoke with homeland security expert Juliette Kayyem ’95 about what the U.S. can do to deter future ransomware attacks.

  • Illustration showing Pinocchio caught in a spider's web with social media icons

    Oh, what a tangled web we weave

    July 7, 2021

    Deception spreads faster than truth on social media. Who — if anyone — should stop it?

  • Minow named University Professor

    ‘We’re on a collision course with sanity’

    June 22, 2021

    Harvard University Professor and former Harvard Law School dean Martha Minow argues for a new Fairness Doctrine and other reforms in a National Constitution Center panel on free speech and media.

  • Jonathan Zittrain testifying before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee

    Towards more interoperable ‘smart’ home devices

    June 16, 2021

    Professor Jonathan Zittrain ’95 appeared as a witness for the Senate Subcommittee on Competition Policy, Antitrust, and Consumer Rights on June 15 to discuss the current state of home technologies and antitrust.

  • Christopher Bavitz

    Christopher Bavitz appointed Harvard Law School’s vice dean for experiential and clinical education

    June 16, 2021

    Harvard Law School’s Christopher T. Bavitz, the WilmerHale Clinical Professor of Law, has been appointed as vice dean for experiential and clinical education.

  • Woman with blue blazer and blue shirt and long black hair in front of pink flowering bush

    ‘We have the common ground of all getting through this together’

    May 18, 2021

    Health law has become especially timely in this year of COVID-19 vaccines and revitalized Obamacare. But for graduating student Phebe Hong ’21, it’s a passion that began in high school.

  • Screenshot of Facebook's main webpage.

    Did Facebook’s Oversight Board get the Trump decision right?

    May 5, 2021

    Professor Noah Feldman, who first proposed the idea of the Oversight Board to Facebook, weighs in on its decision to deplatform President Donald Trump following the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

  • iPhone 11 Pro showing Social media applications on its screen

    How ‘digital witnesses’ are documenting history and challenging the status quo

    March 18, 2021

    A recent event hosted by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society explored how young Black people are using technology for activism around the world.

  • Sidharth Chauhan

    Rethinking digital education in a ‘global classroom’

    February 12, 2021

    As Harvard Law students across the world logged onto Zoom this fall to connect to their professors and peers, Sidharth Chauhan LL.M. ’21 took virtual education a step further.

  • Apryl Williams

    Deconstructing the ‘Karen’ meme

    February 3, 2021

    It’s a scene we unfortunately see too often now: A white woman pulls out her phone to call the police to patrol Black people in public spaces. They become memes, the kind that are studied by Apryl Williams, a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.

  • Closeup of man smoking and wearing a mask

    Should smokers be prioritized for COVID vaccine?

    February 2, 2021

    Should smoking be among the pre-existing health risks that qualify people for priority access to the COVID-19 vaccine? Harvard Law public health expert Carmel Shachar says the answer is yes. 

  • Harvard and Yale health law centers partner for COVID-19 seminar series

    January 28, 2021

    The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School is joining forces with the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy, its counterpart at Yale Law School, to host a seminar series reflecting on ethical and legal issues raised by the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Jonathan Zittrain delivers the 2020 Tanner Lecture

    Gaining power, losing control

    January 28, 2021

    As the 2020 Tanner Lecturer on Human Values at Clare Hall, Cambridge, Harvard Law Professor Jonathan Zittrain explores the clash of free speech and public health online.

  • Rep. Andy Kim and ATF police officers

    For Prof. Ruth Okediji, ‘grievous’ Capitol insurrection holds hopeful lessons

    January 19, 2021

    Harvard Law Professor Ruth Okediji believes recent events can reinvigorate American democracy and serve as a lesson for the world.

  • Illustration of a hand holding a mobile phone, pressing a

    Blocking the president

    January 13, 2021

    Harvard Law experts Yochai Benkler and evelyn douek weigh in on the suspension of President Trump’s social media accounts and potential First Amendment implications.

  • RAP headphone logo

    At the intersection of music and the law

    December 16, 2020

    The music industry is no stranger to legal dispute. From high-profile cases involving Napster, Inc. to the many legal trappings that accompany artists throughout the creative process, the law has continued to evolve along with music. That's Student Practice Organization the Recording Artists Project (RAP) come in.

  • Judge Julie M. Lynch presides over a courtroom remotely

    Online courts: reimagining the future of justice

    December 4, 2020

    Even if there was no COVID-19, online courts would still be the wave of the future: This idea was the starting point for a recent webinar, “Online Courts: Perspectives from the Bench and the Bar,” a half-day event convened by the Harvard Law School Center on the Legal Profession.

  • Male patient getting an injection in the upper arm from a doctor wearing blue gloves.

    What you should know about the COVID-19 vaccine

    December 3, 2020

    Public health expert Carmel Shachar discusses the COVID-19 vaccine, who is likely to get it first, and whether people can be required to get vaccinated.

  • Network map with different colored dots representing media outlets.

    Political discourse and the 2020 U.S. Election

    November 24, 2020

    The Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society researchers Yochai Benkler and Robert Faris document how polarized media in the United States shape political discourse and the 2020 election.

  • Head silhouette with jigsaw puzzle pieces

    Detecting dementia

    November 21, 2020

    Experts gathered this week to discuss the ethical, social, and legal implications of technological advancements that facilitate the early detection of dementia.

  • Connected Parent Zoom panel

    ‘The Connected Parent’ offers guidance, insight into digital parenting

    November 16, 2020

    “The Connected Parent,” a new book by John Palfrey ’01 and Urs Gasser LL.M. ’03  is a practical guide for addressing concerns brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic and navigating an increasingly digital world.

  • Transforming law into a science

    November 10, 2020

    Professor Jim Greiner at the Access to Justice Lab is aiming to find out whether the practice of law can be transformed by using evidence to determine which legal interventions are safe and effective, both for individuals in the justice system and society as a whole.

  • Julie Owono and Evelyn Douek

    ‘Be the Twitter that you want to see in the world’

    November 7, 2020

    Ahead of the 2020 presidential election in the United States, experts from the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society convened to discuss how platforms are approaching mis- and disinformation and what they can improve going forward.

  • Andrew Choi

    Andrew H. Choi ’23, Alaskan arctic warfare expert

    November 5, 2020

    Andrew H. Choi ’23 was eager for a serious challenge in his first Army posting, so he chose as radically different an environment as he could imagine: Fairbanks, Alaska.

  • Emily Miskel sitting at her computer preparing for a virtual trial

    The Jury Is Out—of the Courthouse

    October 20, 2020

    By March 17, just two weeks after Texas reported its first case of COVID-19, Judge Emily Miskel ’08 was back on the figurative bench, presiding over a one-hour virtual temporary restraining order hearing from home.

  • Hate Speech Ignited book cover

    Combatting hate speech in Myanmar

    October 16, 2020

    A month ahead of elections in Myanmar, the International Human Rights Clinic and 18 organizations released a major report documenting and analyzing the role that hate speech, rampant misinformation campaigns, and ultranationalism have played in the resurgence of oppression and human rights violations in the country.

  • voting box with a lock

    Simulating responses to election disinformation

    October 14, 2020

    In an effort to combat multiple potential vectors of attack on the 2020 U.S. election, two Berkman Klein Center affiliates have published a package of “tabletop exercises,” freely available to decisionmakers and the public to simulate realistic scenarios in which disinformation threatens to disrupt the 2020 election.

  • Icon of a lock indicating digital security

    ‘We need to be more imaginative about cybersecurity than we are right now’

    October 7, 2020

    In the “good old days” of cybersecurity risk, we only had to worry about being hacked or downloading malware. But the stakes have ramped up considerably in the past decade, say Berkman Klein directors James Mickens and Jonathan Zittrain.

  • FDA headquarters in Washington DC

    Building public trust in a coronavirus vaccine

    October 6, 2020

    In an interview with Harvard Law Today, Carmel Shachar, executive director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, says that political interference in the FDA’s process for ensuring that a vaccine is both safe and effective “opens the door to a public health disaster.”

  • Border patrol car at the US border with Mexico in San Diego with the fence behind.

    Cyberlaw Clinic weighs in on warrantless device searches at the US border

    August 27, 2020

    Two clinics at HLS— the Cyberlaw Clinic and the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic—partner on a case involving warrantless device searches at the U.S. border

  • Cass Sunstein

    Cass Sunstein tapped to chair WHO technical advisory group

    August 24, 2020

    Cass Sunstein ’78, the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard, has been tapped by the World Health Organization to chair its Technical Advisory Group on Behavioural Insights and Sciences for Health.

  • COVID State of Play

    ‘Feeding the virus’?

    July 30, 2020

    “Confused,” “frustrating,” “fragmented,” “acute,” and “a reckoning” were just some of the ways three health care experts described the U.S. response to the coronavirus pandemic during a recent Berkman Klein virtual discussion.