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Chris Green

  • 2022 Harvard Law School Animal Law Week

    March 22, 2022

    Animal law advocates gather to at Harvard Law School for the eighth annual Animal Law Week.

  • Column: Pork producers are in full squeal over California’s farm animal rules. You should tune them out

    February 23, 2022

    Major pork producers — a big part of Big Meat, as the livestock industry is often known — have been pulling out the stops recently to eviscerate a California law regulating how they treat pregnant sows. They've asked the Supreme Court to overturn the state's regulations. (The justices may issue a decision on whether they'll take the case as soon as Monday.) ... These practices may have been tacitly accepted by the public because pigs weren't seen as they are — as intelligent animals that prefer room to roam. "The sows can't move, they're biting at the bars," says Chris Green, executive director of the Animal Law and Policy Program at Harvard Law School. "There are massive, massive psychological welfare issues."

  • Three women and two men on an outside deck holding a sign Brooks McCormick Jr. Animal Law and Policy Program

    $10 million endowment established for the Harvard Law School Animal Law & Policy Program

    November 10, 2021

    Harvard Law School today announced the establishment of a $10 million endowment for the Animal Law & Policy Program, thanks to a gift from the Brooks Institute for Animal Rights Law and Policy.

  • Dog experiments at VA necessary for ‘only a few areas of research,’ panel says in sweeping report

    July 6, 2020

    A national advisory panel Wednesday concluded that most recent research involving dogs conducted by the Department of Veterans Affairs was unnecessary and that the agency should do more to justify limited use of canines and improve the lives of those still used. The sweeping report underscored long-standing concerns from lawmakers about the canine experimentation. The report, written by an expert panel convened by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine — an independent agency that advises the government — found that dogs remain important models for four areas of cardiovascular and spinal cord research relevant to veterans’ health. But it strongly urged VA to work far harder at identifying alternatives to laboratory dogs, including trials involving pet dogs and methods and technologies that do not involve animals...But in its final recommendation, the panelists said VA could do much more to improve the dogs’ welfare, including by voluntarily submitting animal welfare inspections to the USDA... “This is one we felt really strongly about,” said committee member Chris Green, executive director of Harvard University’s Animal Law and Policy Program. “If it is absolutely vital that dogs are the only option to conduct an experiment that VA determines to be a valid, necessary biomedical experiment, then you make sure the dogs are treated as well as you possibly can.”

  • Resolution on animal training for police passes; some say such measures aren’t ABA’s ‘core mission’

    February 18, 2020

    The importance of providing police officers with comprehensive animal encounter training was addressed in a measure approved by the ABA House of Delegates at the 2020 ABA Midyear Meeting in Austin, Texas, on Monday. Resolution 103A encourages the use of laws and policies that provide training on the amount of force that is reasonably necessary during encounters with family pets and other animals to protect both officers and the public, reduce potential legal liability, and ensure the animals are treated humanely...Chris Green, the executive director of the Animal Law and Policy Program at Harvard Law School and the former chair of the Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section’s Animal Law Committee, spoke in favor of the resolution. He said shootings of animals increase the risk of police officers accidentally shooting innocent bystanders, including children, as well as the legal liability for governments that may need to settle with victims’ families. “When things go wrong, the physical, emotional, legal and financial consequences can be catastrophic,” he said. Green added that when states like Texas and cities like Chicago promoted nonlethal animal encounter training programs, they significantly reduced unnecessary accidents involving police officers and animals.

  • Kansas’s ag-gag law has been ruled unconstitutional

    January 24, 2020

    Kansas cannot bar people from conducting undercover investigations on factory farms, the a federal court in Kansas ruled Wednesday. For nearly 30 years — since 1990 — a Kansas state law made it illegal to take photographs or record video in a factory farm or slaughterhouse “with the intent to damage an enterprise conducted at the animal facility.” ... Animal advocates have responded with caution. “None of the major animal protection groups have done anything in Iowa in the last seven years,” Harvard’s Chris Green told me last year. The ag-gag laws worked. And when Iowa’s law was overturned, animal activists went back to work in the state. (Iowa has since tried another ban, but that one has been held up in court as well.)

  • Boanne Wassink with Charlotte the pig

    Animal Law and Policy Clinic launches at Harvard Law School

    August 5, 2019

    Harvard Law School has announced the launch of the new Animal Law and Policy Clinic, to be led by Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor Katherine Meyer and Clinical Instructor Nicole Negowetti.

  • Fifth annual Animal Law Week held at HLS

    Fifth annual Animal Law Week held at HLS

    April 3, 2019

    Animal law advocates from a variety of disciplines and perspectives come together at Harvard Law School for the fifth annual Animal Law Week.

  • “Ag-gag laws” hide the cruelty of factory farms from the public. Courts are striking them down.

    January 14, 2019

    ... In 2012, the Iowa legislature passed a law banning the collection of evidence of crimes like those. And Iowa isn’t alone. Several states have passed — and many others have considered — so-called “ag gag” laws, which criminalize the undercover investigations that reveal abuses on farms. Legislators have been forthright about their motives too. They’re worried that evidence of what goes on on these farms will outrage Americans — so they want to ban it. ... That means that in practice, no misconduct can ever be proven on only the first day of investigating. “Say you have a DEA agent who spends months undercover to infiltrate a drug cartel,” Chris Green, the executive director of Harvard Law School’s Animal Law & Policy Program, told me. “This is like requiring them to reveal themselves the first time they see a $5 drug buy.” You’ll never get to the heart of the abuses that way — which, of course, may be exactly what the industry, which backs quick-reporting, wants.

  • Raising the profile of animal law to match the stakes

    Raising the profile of animal law to match the stakes

    December 13, 2018

    According to Harvard Law School lecturer Jonathan Lovvorn, saving the planet and its inhabitants from climate catastrophe begins with the world’s most vulnerable population: animals.

  • Students with elephant at the PETA Foundation

    Third Annual Student Animal Law Trip to Washington D.C.

    April 13, 2018

    Last week, the Animal Law & Policy Program (ALPP) at Harvard Law School partnered with the HLS Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) to organize the third annual “Student Animal Law Trip to Washington D.C.”

  • Fourth annual Animal Law Week held at HLS

    Fourth annual Animal Law Week held at HLS

    March 12, 2018

    Animal law advocates from a variety of disciplines and perspectives came together at Harvard Law School  for the fourth annual Animal Law Week, an event co-hosted by the Harvard Animal Law & Policy Program and Harvard Law School's Student Animal Legal Defense Fund . 

  • Jonathan Lovvorn appointed policy director of the HLS Animal Law and Policy Program

    Jonathan Lovvorn appointed policy director of the HLS Animal Law and Policy Program

    September 15, 2017

    On Sept. 5, Harvard Law School Lecturer Jonathan Lovvorn was named the first policy director for the school's Animal Law & Policy Program. Lovvorn, who previously taught Wildlife Law in both the Fall 2015 and Fall 2016 terms, will continue as a lecturer, teaching a new course this fall on Farmed Animal Law & Policy.

  • Animal Law Week links animal rights, environmentalism and activism

    March 22, 2017

    The intersection of climate change, animal testing, and corporate strategic partnerships were among the issues explored during the third annual Animal Law Week, a series of events hosted at Harvard Law School from Feb. 27-March 3 by HLS’s Student Animal Legal Defense Fund (SALDF) and the Harvard Animal Law and Policy Program.

  • Bills Rise As Pet Vets Get More Corporate

    January 30, 2017

    What price would you pay to keep the family pet healthy? The sky's the limit, say America's veterinarians, who are providing the increasingly extensive — and expensive — services to meet the growing demand...The key is do your research ahead of time -- before your animal friend needs care. "The worst time to make a decision is when you're in an emotional state and not thinking clearly and are eager to do whatever it takes to save the life of your animal and keep it healthy," said Chris Green, executive director of the Animal Law & Policy Program at Harvard Law School.

  • Putting his money where his mouth is

    November 3, 2016

    ...“The Massachusetts ballot measure is poised to be the single most progressive piece of farmed animal protection legislation ever passed in the United States,” said Christopher Green, executive director of Harvard Law School’s Animal Law & Policy Program. “Having this happen in our backyard as our program gets off the ground has allowed us to analyze the process in the classroom and given our students the opportunity to gain invaluable experience working directly on the campaign.” Thomas has found a welcome partner in the HLS program. With his recent gift of $1 million and a subsequent matching gift of $500,000 to support individual donations of up to $50,000 through December, he is hoping to make farm animals central to animal cruelty prevention. It’s a shared concern...The program’s work reaches well beyond U.S. borders. Its faculty director, Kristen Stilt, is collaborating with Harvard’s South Asia Institute to examine animal agriculture from the Middle East to Asia.

  • Close up of chickens in cages

    Animal-welfare advocate finds partner in growing Law School program

    November 2, 2016

    With his recent gift of $1 million and a subsequent matching gift of $500,000 to support individual donations of up to $50,000 through December, Charles Thomas is hoping to make farm animals central to animal cruelty prevention.

  • The Case for Treating Animals as Humans

    May 27, 2016

    Earlier this month, when Louisiana’s New Iberia Research Center, the world’s largest chimpanzee research facility, announced it was moving all 220 of its chimps to a sanctuary in Georgia, it’s a safe bet the news made attorney Steven Wise the happiest man on the planet. That’s because two of the chimps, Hercules and Leo, had been the subjects in an ongoing legal battle about the rights of chimps, a legal case brought by Wise, president of the Nonhuman Rights Project, and the subject of D.A. Pennebaker a Chris Hegedus’s Unlocking the Cage, a documentary out now in New York, followed by a national rollout and an HBO broadcast early next year...“It’s a very novel approach and [Wise] is pushing the envelope,” says Chris Green, Executive Director of Harvard Law School’s Animal Law and Policy Program. “As far as acceptance goes, the jury is still out. And there is concern that the animal protection community might get too far in front of itself that if they find a judge who is too far ahead of public sentiment, there might be some sort of backlash.”

  • Massachusetts’ Battle over “Cage Free” Eggs (audio)

    April 20, 2016

    In November, voters in Massachusetts will be asked whether the state should ban the sale of eggs, pork products or veal from animals that are too tightly confined within cages. If the ballot measure passes it would have far reaching consequences for the egg industry both in Massachusetts and several other states. It would also mark a big win for the cage­free egg movement. But are cage­free eggs really more humane for animals or healthier for humans? We hear more from environmental journalist Zack Colman, and Chris Green, Executive Director of the Animal Law and Policy Program at Harvard Law School.

  • The Fight for Cage-Free Eggs

    April 18, 2016

    What should the regulations for animal confinement be? Voters in Massachusetts are poised to decide in a November ballot question whether the state should ban the sale of whole eggs, pork products, or veal from animals that can’t turn around or stretch their limbs within their cages. The prohibition would apply to producers both in and outside the commonwealth, with one of the biggest changes being that eggs sold in the state be “cage-free” when the law goes into effect in 2022, if voters agree to the proposal...“I think especially when you’re dealing with major producers I can’t really see folks taking the risk. The industry is definitely moving on in terms of all the major corporate announcements,” said Chris Green, the executive director of the animal law and policy program at Harvard Law School. But if the Massachusetts ballot initiative is taken up, it’ll be the voters who decide.

  • Delta sued by hunter over exotic animal trophy ban

    October 21, 2015

    An expert in animal law has flown to the defense of Delta Air Lines after a group of safari hunters sued the airline over its ban on transporting exotic animal hunting trophies...Earlier this year, a petition on Change.org asked Delta, the only U.S. airline serving South Africa directly, to stop transporting exotic animal hunting trophies. The petition was filed by Chris Green, a Delta Diamond Medallion frequent flier who has since become the executive director of the animal law and policy program at Harvard Law School. This week, Green responded to the lawsuit in a letter on the Change.org petition page, writing that public response to the lawsuit “will confirm to Delta Air Lines that it did exactly the right thing by listening to the majority of its customers,” adding that “Delta should be commended for sticking to its principled stance.” The post generated hundreds of comments in support in less than 24 hours.

  • Rhino Killer Sues Airline Because He Wants To Bring His Victims Home

    October 20, 2015

    A man who paid $350,000 to shoot a black rhino is now suing an airline for refusing to ship his trophy. Corey Knowlton, who won a permit for the hunt from the Dallas Safari Club back in 2014 and made the trip in May 2015, made headlines when CNN decided to go along with him on his hunt for an endangered black rhino in Namibia..."Other than Walter Palmer himself, I cannot think of a less sympathetic plaintiff to challenge Delta's common-sense policy than Corey Knowlton — the Texan who paid to kill one of Africa's rarest black Rhinos," Chris Green, of Harvard Law School, told The Dodo. "No rational airline ever would want to be associated with transporting this endangered animal's butchered body out of Africa just to go hang on some rich American's wall."