Robert Greenwald

Clinical Professor of Law

Director, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation; Health Law and Policy Clinic

Biography

Robert Greenwald is a Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and the director of the Law School's Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (CHLPI). In addition to teaching seminars in health, public health and food law and policy, for over 20 years Robert has been engaged in state and national research, policy development and advocacy to improve the health of underserved populations, with a focus on the needs of low-income people living with HIV and other chronic illnesses. Robert and the CHLPI team work with consumers, advocates, community-based organizations, health and social services professionals, government officials, and others to expand access to high-quality healthcare, reduce health disparities, and promote more equitable and effective healthcare systems.

Robert is currently serving as a member of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS; co-chair of the Federal Chronic Illness & Disability Partnership; co-chair of the HIV Health Care Access Working Group; and, as a board member of the Bessie Tart Wilson Initiative for Children and Technical Assistance Collaborative for Housing.  Robert has served as an advisor to the President's National Commission on AIDS and to the Health Resources Services Administration & Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Community Advisory Board. Robert received his B.A. from Vassar College in 1980 and his J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law in 1986.

Areas of Interest

Jason Grebely, Gregory J. Dore, Robert Greenwald, Tracy Swan, Soumitri Barua & Lynn E. Taylor, Letter, Hepatitis C Virus Treatment and Persons Who Inject Drugs, 164 Annals Internal Med. 203 (2016).
Categories:
Health Care
,
Discrimination & Civil Rights
Sub-Categories:
Law & Public Policy
,
Health Law & Policy
,
Food & Drug Law
Type: Article
David R. Holtgrave & Robert Greenwald, A SWOT Analysis of the Updated National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the U.S., 2015-2020, 20 AIDS & Behav. 1 (2016).
Categories:
Health Care
,
Discrimination & Civil Rights
Sub-Categories:
Law & Public Policy
,
Health Law & Policy
Type: Article
Abstract
In July 2015, President Barack Obama released an updated National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) for the United States to guide HIV efforts through the year 2020. A federal action plan to accompany the updated NHAS will be released in December 2015. In this editorial, we offer a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats analysis with the aim of increasing discussion of ways to truly fulfill the promise of the updated NHAS and to address barriers that may thwart it from achieving its full potential.
Soumitri Barua, Robert Greenwald, Jason Grebely, Gregory J. Dore, Tracy Swan & Lynn E. Taylor, Restrictions for Medicaid Reimbursement of Sofosbuvir for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the United States, 163 Annals Internal Med. 215 (2015).
Categories:
Health Care
,
Discrimination & Civil Rights
Sub-Categories:
Social Welfare Law
,
Law & Public Policy
,
Food & Drug Law
,
Health Law & Policy
Type: Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate state Medicaid policies for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with sofosbuvir in the United States. Medicaid reimbursement criteria for sofosbuvir were evaluated in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The authors searched state Medicaid Web sites between 23 June and 7 December 2014 and extracted data in duplicate. Any differences were resolved by consensus. Data were extracted on whether sofosbuvir was covered and the criteria for coverage based on the following categories: liver disease stage, HIV co-infection, prescriber type, and drug or alcohol use. Of the 42 states with known Medicaid reimbursement criteria for sofosbuvir, 74% limit sofosbuvir access to persons with advanced fibrosis (Meta-Analysis of Histologic Data in Viral Hepatitis [METAVIR] fibrosis stage F3) or cirrhosis (F4). One quarter of states require persons co-infected with HCV and HIV to be receiving antiretroviral therapy or to have suppressed HIV RNA levels. Two thirds of states have restrictions based on prescriber type, and 88% include drug or alcohol use in their sofosbuvir eligibility criteria, with 50% requiring a period of abstinence and 64% requiring urine drug screening. Heterogeneity is present in Medicaid reimbursement criteria for sofosbuvir with respect to liver disease staging, HIV co-infection, prescriber type, and drug or alcohol use across the United States. Restrictions do not seem to conform with recommendations from professional organizations, such as the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Current restrictions seem to violate federal Medicaid law, which requires states to cover drugs consistent with their U.S. Food and Drug Administration labels.
Robert Greenwald, Presentation at the 7th Annual Hunger Action Summit, Food as Medicine: The Case for Insurance Coverage for Medically-Tailored Food Under the Affordable Care Act (Jan. 30, 2015).
Categories:
Health Care
,
Government & Politics
,
Discrimination & Civil Rights
Sub-Categories:
Law & Public Policy
,
Social Welfare Law
,
Congress & Legislation
,
Government Benefits
,
Food & Drug Law
,
Health Law & Policy
Type: Presentation
Abstract
Presentation at the 7th Annual Hunger Action Summit, January 30, 2015, in Santa Clara, CA.
Robert Greenwald, The Role of Community-Based Clinical Legal Education in Supporting Public Interest Lawyering, 42 Harv. C.R.-C.L. L. Rev.569 (2007).
Categories:
Legal Profession
Sub-Categories:
Clinical Legal Education
,
Legal Education
,
Legal Services
Type: Article
Abstract
At a time when law schools increasingly promote high-profile, "cutting edge" clinical programs to attract potential law students, it may seem odd to celebrate the place of community-based legal service programs in clinical legal education. However, it is my belief that such programs serve an important role in legal education and support ongoing participation in public interest-oriented legal service. Community-based clinical programs provide law students with an opportunity to build practical lawyering skills while exposing students to the significant opportunities that exist to use their newly acquired legal skills to promote social justice. In addition to imparting experiential learning through working with clients, law clinics anchored around community-based legal services provide the next generation of attorneys with the opportunity to better understand and help bridge the access-to-justice gap of poor and low-income clients in their own communities. They offer law students firsthand exposure to the dramatic consequences of increasingly insufficient funding of traditional legal service programs and demonstrate that public interest lawyering plays a significant role in advancing social justice by addressing the day-to-day legal service needs of individuals who otherwise would largely go unrepresented. The sponsorship and endorsement of community-oriented legal services by law schools helps to seed in law students a professional commitment to public service. It is this commitment, which I have seen nurtured in law students and fully realized in law school graduates, that leads me to conclude confidently that with the ongoing support of community-based clinical programs, the next generation will continue the tradition of lawyers serving at the forefront of the social justice movement.

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