Alain Laurent Verbeke

Visiting Professor of Law

Winter and Spring Terms 2018

Biography

Alain Laurent Verbeke is a Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School since 2007. He is a Full University Professor of Private Law & ADR, at KU Leuven in Belgium (since 1991), also a Professor of Private Law & Comparative Law at Tilburg University in the Netherlands (since 1999) and Professor of Law at UCP Lisbon Global School of Law in Portugal (since 2008). As an attorney, he is a Senior Partner at Greenille by Laga Deloitte Legal (since 2001), the leading private client firm in Belgium.

At the KU Leuven Faculty of Law, he is Director of the Rector Dillemans Family Property Law Institute; co-director of the Institute for Contract Law and the Center for Notary Law. He chairs the Faculty Appointment and Promotion Commission. At the KU Leuven Faculty of Psychology, he is co-chair of LCM, the Leuven Center for Collaborative Management. In both faculties, he is (co)supervising numerous Ph.D. and post-doctoral research. In Harvard, he is affiliated with PON, the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

In Leuven, his current teaching includes family property law, estate planning, contracts, comparative law, negotiation and mediation. He is teaching negotiation in Harvard, Lisbon and Tilburg. He was awarded the Belgian Francqui Chair (2010-2011, VUB), the KBC Chair in Family Wealth (2014-2015, Antwerp Management School) and the Gommaar van Oosterwyck Chair in Notary Law (2003, VUB).

As an attorney, at the bars of Brussels and Kortrijk, he heads Greenille, the private client department of Laga Deloitte Legal. He is supervising three service lines: advisory (estate planning and international wealth structuring), conflict handling (including estate litigation, negotiation, mediation, arbitration) and family and business dynamics (facilitating processes of family dynamics, family governance and next gen trajectories, in large family businesses). 

See Academic CV and publications at https://www.law.kuleuven.be/fvr/nl/pdf/cvALV

Areas of Interest

Robert H. Mnookin, Pieter-Augustijn Van Malleghem & Alain-Laurent Verbeke, Opinion, Belgium's Loveless Marriage, Wall St. J., Jan. 6, 2012.
Categories:
International, Foreign & Comparative Law
Sub-Categories:
Foreign Law
Type: News
Abstract
There will be no divorce, for now. But the latest 'reforms' don't correct the basic political dysfunctions of a country so divided.
Robert H. Mnookin & Alain Laurent Verbeke, Persistent Nonviolent Conflict with No Reconciliation: The Flemish and Walloons in Belgium, 72 Law & Contemp. Probs. 151 (2009).
Categories:
International, Foreign & Comparative Law
,
Civil Practice & Procedure
,
Government & Politics
Sub-Categories:
Dispute Resolution
,
Foreign Relations
Type: Article
Abstract
Mnookin and Verbeke describe the nonviolent but very serious conflict in Belgium between the Flemish (Dutch) of the North and the Walloons (French) of the South. The Flemish economy is more prosperous than the Walloon economy, and the Flemish constitute a majority of the Belgian population. Nevertheless, the Walloons enjoy a financial subsidy from the Flemish and share equally in the political power of the nation due to antimajoritarian restrictions built into the government structure. Even though significant and persistent, this conflict remains nonviolent due to several factors, including largely separate geography, language and social structure; a low-stakes conflict; relatively small wealth disparities; a federal system largely enabling separate political systems; and a pragmatic tradition. Mnookin and Verbeke argue that the disputants can continue to coexist with a civilized separation short of divorce. They further point out that the very factors that help keep this conflict nonviolent also serve to provide little incentive to work toward a more cooperative relationship.
Robert H. Mnookin & Alain Laurent Verbeke, Op-Ed, Bye Bye Belgium?, Int'l Herald Trib., Dec. 20, 2006.
Categories:
International, Foreign & Comparative Law
Sub-Categories:
European Law
Type: News

Bar Admissions

Education History