Published from to
Publication Types
Categories
Alan M. Dershowitz, Op-Ed., When Politics is Criminalized, N.Y. Times, Nov. 29, 2017, at A23.
Categories:
Government & Politics
Sub-Categories:
Congress & Legislation
,
Corruption
,
Executive Office
,
Politics & Political Theory
,
Government Accountability
Type: News
Alan Dershowitz, Original Intent: The Many Arguments of Justice Antonin Scalia, N.Y. Times Book Rev., Nov. 5, 2017, at 10 (reviewing Scalia Speaks (Christopher J. Scalia & Edward Whelan eds., 2017)).
Categories:
Government & Politics
,
Legal Profession
Sub-Categories:
Judges & Jurisprudence
,
Supreme Court of the United States
,
Biography & Tribute
Type: News
Alan M. Dershowitz, The Hard Right and Hard Left Pose Different Dangers, Wall St. J., Sept. 11, 2017.
Categories:
Government & Politics
Sub-Categories:
Politics & Political Theory
,
National Security Law
Type: News
Alan Dershowitz, Trumped Up: How Criminalization of Political Differences Endangers Democracy (2017).
Categories:
Government & Politics
Sub-Categories:
Executive Office
,
Elections & Voting
,
Politics & Political Theory
Type: Book
Abstract
In our current age of hyper-partisan politics, nearly everyone takes sides. This is especially true with regard to the Trump presidency. It has become difficult to have a reasonable discussion about the most controversial president in our recent history. For Trump zealots, their president has not only committed no crimes, he has done nothing wrong. For anti-Trump zealots, nothing Trump has done—even in foreign policy—is good. Everything he has done is wrong, and since it is wrong, it must necessarily be criminal. This deeply undemocratic fallacy—that political sins must be investigated and prosecuted as criminal—is an exceedingly dangerous trend. Hardening positions on both sides has been manifested by increasing demands to criminalize political differences. Both sides scream “lock ‘em up” instead of making substantive criticisms of opposing views. The real fear, as Alan Dershowitz argues, in this compelling collection, is that we have weakened our national commitment to civil liberties as the Left becomes ever more intolerant and the Right slips into authoritarian rhetoric. The vibrant center is weakening, with traditional liberalism and conservatism becoming further apart, not just in approach, but in their respect for Constitutional norms that have served us well for more than two centuries. While Donald Trump is not the only cause of this profound division, his election drew it to the surface and made it the dominant paradigm of political debate. Unless we as a nation begin to focus again on what unites us rather than on what divides us, America might not survive the next decade.
Wendy Kaminer & Alan Dershowitz, Where’s the ACLU When You Need It?, Wall St. J., May 11, 2017.
Categories:
Constitutional Law
,
Government & Politics
,
Discrimination & Civil Rights
Sub-Categories:
First Amendment
,
Civil Rights
,
Politics & Political Theory
Type: News
Alan M. Dershowitz, Abraham: The World’s First (But Certainly Not Last) Jewish Lawyer (Schocken Books 2015).
Categories:
Disciplinary Perspectives & Law
,
Legal Profession
Sub-Categories:
Jewish Law
,
Legal History
Type: Book
Abstract
"One of the world’s best-known attorneys gives us a no-holds-barred history of Jewish lawyers: from the biblical Abraham through modern-day advocates who have changed the world by challenging the status quo, defending the unpopular, contributing to the rule of law, and following the biblical command to pursue justice. The Hebrew Bible’s two great examples of advocacy on behalf of problematic defendants—Abraham trying to convince God not to destroy the people of Sodom, and Moses trying to convince God not to destroy the golden-calf-worshipping Children of Israel—established the template for Jewish lawyers for the next 4,500 years. Whether because throughout history Jews have found themselves unjustly accused of crimes ranging from deicide to ritual child murder to treason, or because the biblical exhortation that “justice, justice, shall you pursue” has been implanted in the Jewish psyche, Jewish lawyers have been at the forefront in battles against tyranny, in advocating for those denied due process, in negotiating for just and equitable solutions to complex legal problems, and in efforts to ensure a fair trial for anyone accused of a crime. Dershowitz profiles Jewish lawyers well-known and unheralded, admired and excoriated, victorious and defeated—and, of course, gives us some glimpses into the gung-ho practice of law, Dershowitz-style. Louis Brandeis, Theodor Herzl, Judah Benjamin, Max Hirschberg, René Cassin, Bruno Kreisky, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Irwin Cotler are just a few of the “idol smashers, advocates, collaborators, rescuers, and deal makers” who helped to change history. Dershowitz’s thoughts on the future of the Jewish lawyer are presented with the same insight, shrewdness, and candor that are the hallmarks of his more than four decades of writings on the law and how it is (and should be!) practiced." --Publisher
Alan M. Dershowitz, Finding, Framing, and Hanging Jefferson: A Lost Letter, a Remarkable Discovery, and Freedom of Speech in an Age of Terrorism (John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2008).
Categories:
Legal Profession
,
Constitutional Law
Sub-Categories:
First Amendment
,
Biography & Tribute
,
Legal History
Type: Book
Abstract
The #1 New York Times bestselling author, Harvard Law School professor, and tireless defender of civil liberties unearths a little-known letter by his hero, Thomas Jefferson, and shares its secrets. The letter illuminates Jefferson’s views on freedom of speech in a way that has important implications for the country today, particularly in the struggle against terrorism. This book is about the remarkable letter Dershowitz found, how he found it, and why it matters not only to him, but to us today.
Alan M. Dershowitz, America on Trial: Inside the Legal Battles That Transformed Our Nation (Warner Books 2004).
Categories:
Legal Profession
,
Criminal Law & Procedure
,
Government & Politics
Sub-Categories:
Jury Trials
,
Courts
,
Judges & Jurisprudence
,
Supreme Court of the United States
,
Legal History
Type: Book
Abstract
The Boston Massacre. The Dred Scott decision. The Chicago Seven. O.J. Simpson. These are some of the trials that have both shaped and fascinated American society. Alan M. Dershowitz, who has been either a lawyer, consultant, or commentator on some of the most celebrated cases of the 1970s, 80s and 90s, highlights the trials he believes to be the most significant in our history, and discuses how they were central to the development of America's political and social structure.
Alan M. Dershowitz, Rights from Wrongs: A Secular Theory of the Origins of Rights (Basic Books 2004).
Categories:
Discrimination & Civil Rights
,
International, Foreign & Comparative Law
,
Environmental Law
,
Government & Politics
,
Constitutional Law
,
Disciplinary Perspectives & Law
Sub-Categories:
Religion
,
Constitutional History
,
Civil Rights
,
Religious Rights
,
Legal Theory & Philosophy
,
Animal Law
,
Politics & Political Theory
,
Human Rights Law
Type: Book
Abstract
Where do our rights come from Does "natural law" really exist outside of what is written in constitutions and legal statutes If so, why are rights not the same everywhere and in all eras On the other hand, if rights are nothing more than the product
Alan M. Dershowitz, Reasonable Doubts: The Criminal Justice System and the O.J. Simpson Case (Simon & Schuster 1997).
Categories:
Criminal Law & Procedure
Sub-Categories:
Criminal Evidence
,
Criminal Justice & Law Enforcement
,
Jury Trials
,
Criminal Defense
,
Criminal Prosecution
Type: Book
Abstract
One of America's leading appeal lawyers, Alan Dershowitz was the man chosen to prepare the appeal should O.J. Simpson have been convicted. Now Professor Dershowitz uses this case to examine the larger issues and to identify the social forces - media, money, gender, and race - that shape the criminal-justice system in America today. How could one of the longest trials in the history of America's judicial system produce a verdict after only hours of jury deliberation? Was this really a case of circumstantial evidence?
Alan M. Dershowitz, The Death Penalty in the Court: How It All Began, in Reason and Passion Justice Brennan's Enduring Influence (E. Joshua Rosenkranz & Bernard Schwartz eds., 1997).
Categories:
Legal Profession
,
Government & Politics
,
Criminal Law & Procedure
,
Constitutional Law
Sub-Categories:
Eighth Amendment
,
Capital Punishment
,
Supreme Court of the United States
,
Judges & Jurisprudence
,
Biography & Tribute
Type: Book