Amanda L. Kool

Lecturer on Law

2016-2017

Transactional Law Clinic, 4103
6 Everett St

617-496-4583

Biography

Amanda L. Kool is a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School and a Clinical Instructor in the Transactional Law Clinics of Harvard Law School. Amanda directs the Community Enterprise Project, a clinical program of the Transactional Law Clinics that serves clients who live and work in the Boston neighborhoods surrounding the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School. Under her supervision, Amanda’s clinical students represent small businesses, entrepreneurs, community groups, and nonprofit organizations with respect to entity formation, contract drafting and negotiation, corporate governance, regulatory compliance, intellectual property protection, and other transactional legal matters. In addition to engaging in direct client representation, Community Enterprise Project students partner with community organizations to develop and implement strategies to address persistent legal barriers to economic development. To this end, Community Enterprise Project students conduct workshops and produce educational materials for targeted audiences on specific legal issues, as well as develop networks of technical assistance providers and other resources around a particular industry or need. Past projects have focused on the food truck industry in Boston, first-time home buyers regarding the unique aspects of condo ownership, entrepreneurial military veterans, models for community-sourced, localized investment under the Jumpstart Our Business Startups (JOBS) Act of 2012, and the legal implications of business ownership by immigrant entrepreneurs.

Beyond her work in the Transactional Law Clinics, Amanda serves as a Supervising Attorney with the Harvard Recording Artists Project, a student practice organization in which teams of Harvard Law School students join with Berklee College of Music students to represent recording artists, producers, composers, and other music industry professionals in a broad range of entertainment law matters.

Prior to joining the Transactional Law Clinics of Harvard Law School as a Clinical Fellow in 2012, Amanda was an associate at Nixon Peabody LLP in Boston, where she represented financial institutions and emerging growth and middle market companies. She also served as the firm’s coordinator of pro bono matters for transactional attorneys and engaged in pro bono representation of nonprofit organizations and military veterans. Other past legal experience includes positions with the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Conservation Law Foundation, and Resource Conflicts Institute in Nakuru, Kenya.

Amanda earned her JD from Northeastern University School of Law and a BA from the University of Kentucky. Prior to law school, Amanda performed as a percussionist, taught music, and worked for a number of arts organizations across the Southeast and Midwest.

Amanda will co-teach the forthcoming Transactional Law Clinics course and accompanying seminar during the Winter 2015 term.

Areas of Interest

Amanda Kool & Brett Heeger, Many Advocates, One Goal: How Lawyers Can Use Community Partnerships to Foster Local Economic Development, A.B.A. Comm. Econ. Dev. News, July 2014.
Categories:
Government & Politics
,
Legal Profession
Sub-Categories:
State & Local Government
,
Legal Services
Type: Article
Amanda Kool, Compensation Without Deterrence: Why the AC21’s Proposed Compensation Mechanism Would Fail to Address Crop Contamination, 18 A.B.A. Ag. Mgt. News 8 (2013).
Categories:
Environmental Law
Sub-Categories:
Agriculture Law
Type: Article
Amanda Kool, Halting Pig in the Parlor Patents : Nuisance Law as a Tool to Redress Crop Contamination , 50 Jurimetrics 453 (2010).
Categories:
Property Law
,
Environmental Law
Sub-Categories:
Agriculture Law
,
Intellectual Property - Patent & Trademark
Type: Article
Abstract
The legal discourse regarding the problem of crop contamination caused by stray genetically modified (GM) traits generally centers around two remedies: the reduction in patent protection afforded to subsequent generations of patented seed, and the use of common law to protect the property rights of the farmer whose crops have been contaminated. This article supports the latter approach, specifically advocating for a private nuisance suit by the owner of the contaminated crop against the owner of the patented traits. The author argues that the former approach is not only unlikely to succeed, but may also prove detrimental to those farmers who find themselves growing patented crops they do not want. The author contends that a private nuisance suit is the most appropriate of all the applicable tort law remedies because it allows the court to balance the interests of the farmer, the patent owner, and society as a whole, thereby fashioning a remedy that fits the distinct characteristics of the case at hand. Furthermore, the author argues that existing case law supports a private nuisance claim brought by a model plaintiff against a seed patent owner. The author then builds the model plaintiff’s case, using existing case law to guide the discussion.

Bar Admissions

Education History

Transactional Law Clinic, 4103
6 Everett St

617-496-4583