Ken Basin

Lecturer on Law

Winter 2017

Biography

Ken Basin is a Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, where he has taught Entertainment and Media Law since the 2013–14 academic year. His research and teaching interests are primarily in entertainment, media, and intellectual property law.

Basin currently works as Vice President, U.S. Business Affairs for Sony Pictures Television, where he is responsible for dealmaking in support of Sony’s broad slate of scripted and unscripted network, basic cable, premium cable, first-run syndicated, and first-run digital programming. Before joining Sony, Basin served as the Co-Head of Business Affairs at Amazon Studios, where he managed and supervised all Business Affairs department functions in support of Amazon’s development, production, and distribution of original television series and motion pictures. After earning his law degree and prior to joining Amazon, Basin worked as an Associate at Greenberg Glusker Fields Claman & Machtinger, LLP, where he served as Associate Chair of the firm’s Entertainment Department.

Basin graduated summa cum laude from the University of Southern California before graduating magna cum laude from Harvard Law School, where he was awarded the Sears Prize. His scholarship has appeared in the Harvard Journal of Sports & Entertainment Law, the Journal of Copyright Society of the U.S.A., and the UCLA Entertainment Law Review. He also holds adjunct faculty appointments at the UCLA School of Law and Southwestern Law School, and serves on the UCLA School of Law Entertainment Symposium Advisory Committee.

Aaron J. Moss & Kenneth Basin, Copyright Termination and Loan-Out Corporations: Reconciling Practice and Policy, 3 Harv. J. Sports & Ent. L. 55 (2012).
Categories:
Disciplinary Perspectives & Law
,
Property Law
Sub-Categories:
Arts & Entertainment Law
,
Intellectual Property - Copyright
Type: Article
Abstract
This article examines, and seeks to reconcile, the conflict between the widespread use of loan-out corporations in the entertainment industry and the 1976 Copyright Act’s restriction on artists’ termination rights. Part II reviews the background, policy rationale, and general legal structure of the termination rights, as embodied in the Copyright Act. Part III offers a brief summary of the history and rationale of loan-out corporations and explains in greater detail the challenges they pose to statutory termination rights. Part IV explores and critiques the legal arguments that lawyers and litigants might use to invoke termination rights for artists who have relied on loan-out corporations. Part V assesses options for legislative and contractual amendments that would alleviate the conflict between loan-out corporations and termination rights. Part VI concludes.
Kenneth Basin & Tina Rad, I Could Have Been a Fragrance Millionaire: Toward a Federal Idea Protection Act, 56 J. Copyright Soc’y U.S.A. 731 (2009).
Categories:
Property Law
,
Disciplinary Perspectives & Law
Sub-Categories:
Arts & Entertainment Law
,
Intellectual Property - Copyright
,
Property Rights
Type: Article
Robert S. Rogoyski & Kenneth Basin, The Bloody Case That Started From a Parody: American Intellectual Property Policy and the Pursuit of Democratic Ideals in Modern China, 16 UCLA Ent. L. Rev. 237 (2009).
Categories:
Disciplinary Perspectives & Law
,
Property Law
,
International, Foreign & Comparative Law
Sub-Categories:
Arts & Entertainment Law
,
East Asian Legal Studies
,
Intellectual Property - Copyright
Type: Article

Education History

Current Courses

Course Catalog View