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Michael Fertik & David Thompson, The Reputation Economy: How to Optimize Your Digital Footprint in a World Where Your Reputation Is Your Most Valuable Asset (Random House 2015).
Categories:
Technology & Law
Sub-Categories:
Communications Law
,
Information Privacy & Security
,
Networked Society
Type: Book
Abstract
Your reputation defines how people see you and what they will do for you. It determines whether your bank will lend you money to buy a house or car; whether your landlord will accept you as a tenant; which employers will hire you and how much they will pay you. It can even affect your marriage prospects. And in the coming Reputation Economy, it’s getting more powerful than ever. Because today, thanks to rapid advances in digital technology, anyone access huge troves of information about you – your buying habits, your finances, your professional and personal networks, and even your physical whereabouts – at any time. In a world where technology allows companies and individuals alike to not only gather all this data but also aggregate it and analyze it with frightening speed, accuracy, and sophistication, our digital reputations are fast becoming our most valuable currency.
Michael Fertik, A Tale of Two Internets, 308 Sci. Am., Feb. 2013 at 13.
Categories:
Technology & Law
Sub-Categories:
Communications Law
,
Networked Society
Type: Article
Michael Fertik & David Thompson, Wild West 2.0: How to Protect and Restore Your Reputation on the Untamed Social Frontier (AMACOM 2010).
Categories:
Technology & Law
Sub-Categories:
Communications Law
,
Information Privacy & Security
,
Networked Society
Type: Book
Abstract
The Internet is like the Old West—a frontier rich with opportunity and hope, but also a rough-and-tumble land of questionable characters, dubious legal jurisdictions, and hidden dangers. And just like the Old West, if you want to stake out your territory, you have to get there first and fend for yourself. On the web, that means defending your good name and reputation before the attacks start. Because, despite the excellent product or service you provide, all it takes is one unhappy customer, jealous acquaintance, or unsavory competitor to start the rumors flying. Before you know it, search engines are regenerating that negative publicity every time someone researches you or your business.