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The Clinical Legal Education Program is one of the most important and valued aspects of a Harvard Law School education, confirming our commitment to providing our students with the best possible educational experience. With dozens of in-house clinics and hundreds of externships, Harvard Law School has more clinical opportunities than any law school in the world. Some of the clinics include:

Clinical education at HLS helps to introduce and explore the roles and responsibilities of a lawyer. Taking a clinical course may aid students in thinking about what sort of law practice or lawyering work they like most. Mentored practice, in an educational setting, also helps students begin to understand their learning styles while getting a head start on learning the skills they will need when they begin their careers.

The Clinical Legal Education Program at Harvard Law School has three basic components:

  • direct student responsibility for clients in a realistic practice setting;
  • supervision and mentoring by an experienced practitioner; and
  • companion classroom sessions in which clinical experience supports and contributes to further discussion and thought.

Seventy-five percent of the class of 2015 participated in clinical work while at HLS. Many students find that this practical lawyering produces a sense of personal accomplishment as well as professional development because, in many cases, they are truly increasing access to justice for the most marginalized members of society. HLS also offers externship placements at various government agencies, nonprofits, and small firms. Many students take advantage of the winter term, spending three to four weeks off campus in a clinical setting and then coming back to campus and continuing the work remotely for the following semester. Students can also design independent clinical work projects that are tailored to unique interests.

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Louis Fisher ’16 is inaugural Harvard Law Review Public Interest Fellow

December 11, 2017

From Harvard Law Today—He will spend a year working at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF) and will have the opportunity to have a short piece relating to his work considered for publication in the Law Review’s online Forum at the end of the year.

Spring 2018 Independent Clinical Opportunities: Election Law and Voting Rights

December 8, 2017

Remote placements for 2 or 3 clinical credits with the following organizations: ACLU Voting Rights Project; Campaign Legal Center; NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund; Asian Americans Advancing Justice; Free Speech for People. More placements will be added to this list as they are confirmed. Please check for updates to this posting.

My time at the International Human Rights Clinic

December 8, 2017

By Salomé Gómez Upegui LL.M. '18—I believe in law as an instrument for social change, and I came to Harvard interested in focusing on that. A year is not much time, and as any LLM student can confirm, we all suffer from “fear of missing out”.  I’m happy to say the International Human Rights Clinic, […]

Advancing human rights in the Middle East

December 8, 2017

By Zeineb Bouraoui LL.M. '18—The Clinic constituted an eye-opening experience to me, allowing me to understand firsthand the challenges that human rights lawyers and activists are routinely facing with funding, media outreach and advocacy, or even the simple act of gathering accurate and reliable information.

The Hidden Health Crisis of the Opioid Epidemic

December 8, 2017

From Health Law and Policy Clinic—The problem is that more Americans than ever are injecting opioids and inadvertently infecting themselves with hepatitis C. Shared needles mean shared blood-borne infections—and that’s how the opioid crisis has created a new generation of hepatitis C patients.