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HLS strongly promotes public service. The school guarantees funding for summer public interest work, and over 480 JD students received funds to work throughout the United States and in 44 foreign countries in 2014. The Office of Public Interest Advising provides comprehensive services to students pursuing public service careers. The Low Income Protection Plan allows graduates substantial financial flexibility to pursue lower-paying employment, and a variety of fellowship programs provide additional support to graduates entering public service. Reflecting its public service commitment, HLS has a 50-hour minimum pro bono work requirement, with students actually completing an average of 600 hours of pro bono work during law school.

Public Service News

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition

Harvard Law Review releases special bicentennial edition

November 30, 2017

In honor of Harvard Law School’s bicentennial, in October the Harvard Law Review published a collection of six articles exploring Harvard’s contribution to the development of the law, and how that history will shape the future of the law in theory and practice.

Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

November 29, 2017
Risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform: A Q&A with Chris Bavitz

Managing Director of the Cyberlaw Clinic Professor Chris Bavitz discusses some of the concerns and opportunities of risk assessment tools for criminal justice reform efforts, and the Berkman Klein Center's work on Ethics and Governance of AI initiative in partnership with the MIT Media Lab.

Mentors, Friends and Sometime Adversaries

November 29, 2017
Mentors, Friends and Sometime Adversaries

Mentorships between Harvard Law School professors and the students who followed them into academia have taken many forms over the course of two centuries.

Interview with a new dean

November 29, 2017
Interview with a new dean

John Manning ’85 on getting advice, giving it and “doing disagreement right.”

Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

November 28, 2017
Julian SpearChief-Morris is the first indigenous student to head Harvard Law School’s Legal Aid Bureau

Julian SpearChief-Morris ’17 is the first indigenous student to lead the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, marking his place in the storied history of the bureau which was founded in 1913 to provide legal services to low-income clients in the Boston area.